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dc.contributor.authorVesnaver, Aldo
dc.contributor.authorLin, Rongzhi
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-06T10:29:31Z
dc.date.available2022-06-06T10:29:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-09
dc.identifier.citationVesnaver, A., & Lin, R. (2019). Broadband Q-factor tomography for reservoir monitoring. Journal of Applied Geophysics, 165, 1–15. doi:10.1016/j.jappgeo.2019.04.004
dc.identifier.issn1879-1859
dc.identifier.issn0926-9851
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jappgeo.2019.04.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/678683
dc.description.abstractTime-lapse analysis of seismic surveys to monitor hydrocarbon production has been based so far mainly on amplitude and traveltime changes of seismic signals. However, lab measurements of rock properties show that we can also expect observable changes in the anelastic absorption, when the originally saturating fluids are replaced by others, or even when compaction or fractures are induced. These changes can be detected by Q-factor reflection tomography and used for time-lapse analysis, as a complement to traveltime inversion. Indeed, the seismic signal change due to fluid substitution is observable both in P velocity and Q factor estimates, and from case to case one can be stronger than the other. Their coupled inversion reduces the uncertainties for interpreters involved in reservoir characterization, providing them more information for detecting different lithotypes. The time-lapse tomography we adopted limits the variations of P velocity and Q factor away from the reservoir, and imposes that the interfaces' structure is the same in those external areas. The mismatch between actual and estimated models decreases significantly when these mutual constraints are applied, with respect to an uncoupled inversion where both rock parameters and interfaces' structures are inverted in a totally independent way. The resolution needed for reservoir monitoring is high, so a macro-model analysis, as provided by traveltime inversion or the frequency shift method for the Q factor, is not sufficient. However, those estimates may be complemented with a high-frequency component obtained by the instantaneous frequency. The resulting broadband image in depth for the anelastic absorption may approximate results typical of full-waveform inversion, but at a much cheaper computational cost.
dc.description.sponsorshipOur work was partially funded by the Petroleum Institute Research Centre (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) and by the grant OSR-2015-CRG4-2619 from KAUST (Thuwal, Saudi Arabia). We thank Gualtiero Bohm, Davide Gei and Jose' Carcione (OGS, Italy) who kindly provided the computer codes for seismic tomography and modelling, and Tariq Alkhalifah (KAUST) for the support and encouragements.
dc.publisherELSEVIER
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0926985118301952
dc.subjectBroadband seismic
dc.subjectTomography
dc.subjectTime-lapse
dc.subjectQ factor
dc.subjectAttenuation
dc.titleBroadband Q-factor tomography for reservoir monitoring
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF APPLIED GEOPHYSICS
dc.identifier.wosutWOS:000471362600001
dc.contributor.institutionKhalifa Univ, Petr Inst, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates
dc.contributor.institutionOGS Italian Natl Inst Oceanog & Appl Geophys, Borgo Grotta Gigante 42-c, I-34010 Trieste, Italy
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
dc.identifier.volume165
dc.identifier.pages1-15
kaust.grant.numberOSR-2015-CRG4-2619
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85063930595


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