Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGunner, Richard
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Rory P.
dc.contributor.authorHolton, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Phil
dc.contributor.authorBell, Stephen H.
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Nikki J.
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Nigel C.
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Sam
dc.contributor.authorGovender, Danny
dc.contributor.authorViljoen, Pauli
dc.contributor.authorBruns, Angela
dc.contributor.authorvan Schalkwyk, O. Louis
dc.contributor.authorBertelsen, Mads F.
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.contributor.authorvan Rooyen, Martin C.
dc.contributor.authorTambling, Craig J.
dc.contributor.authorGöppert, Aoife
dc.contributor.authorDiesel, Delmar
dc.contributor.authorScantlebury, D. Michael
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-20T07:21:52Z
dc.date.available2022-01-20T07:21:52Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-19
dc.date.submitted2021-09-03
dc.identifier.citationGunner, R. M., Wilson, R. P., Holton, M. D., Hopkins, P., Bell, S. H., Marks, N. J., … Scantlebury, D. M. (2022). Decision rules for determining terrestrial movement and the consequences for filtering high-resolution global positioning system tracks: a case study using the African lion ( Panthera leo ). Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 19(186). doi:10.1098/rsif.2021.0692
dc.identifier.issn1742-5662
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsif.2021.0692
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/675057
dc.description.abstractThe combined use of global positioning system (GPS) technology and motion sensors within the discipline of movement ecology has increased over recent years. This is particularly the case for instrumented wildlife, with many studies now opting to record parameters at high (infra-second) sampling frequencies. However, the detail with which GPS loggers can elucidate fine-scale movement depends on the precision and accuracy of fixes, with accuracy being affected by signal reception. We hypothesized that animal behaviour was the main factor affecting fix inaccuracy, with inherent GPS positional noise (jitter) being most apparent during GPS fixes for non-moving locations, thereby producing disproportionate error during rest periods. A movement-verified filtering (MVF) protocol was constructed to compare GPS-derived speed data with dynamic body acceleration, to provide a computationally quick method for identifying genuine travelling movement. This method was tested on 11 free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) fitted with collar-mounted GPS units and tri-axial motion sensors recording at 1 and 40 Hz, respectively. The findings support the hypothesis and show that distance moved estimates were, on average, overestimated by greater than 80% prior to GPS screening. We present the conceptual and mathematical protocols for screening fix inaccuracy within high-resolution GPS datasets and demonstrate the importance that MVF has for avoiding inaccurate and biased estimates of movement.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research contributes to the CAASE project funded by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) under the KAUST Sensor Initiative. Fieldwork was supported in part by a Department for Economy Global Challenges Research Fund grant to D.M.S.
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.relation.urlhttps://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsif.2021.0692
dc.rightsPublished by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleDecision rules for determining terrestrial movement and the consequences for filtering high-resolution global positioning system tracks: a case study using the African lion ( Panthera leo )
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.identifier.journalJournal of The Royal Society Interface
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionSwansea Lab for Animal Movement, Biosciences, College of Science, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment for the Ecology of Animal Societies, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, 78315 Radolfzell, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
dc.contributor.institutionMammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 002, South Africa
dc.contributor.institutionSavanna and Grassland Research Unit, South African National Parks, Scientific Services Skukuza, Kruger National Park, Skukuza 1350, South Africa
dc.contributor.institutionVeterinary Wildlife Services, South African National Parks, 97 Memorial Road, Old Testing Grounds, 8301 Kimberley, South Africa
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Government of South Africa, Skukuza, South Africa
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Migration, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, 78315 Radolfzell, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Zoo and Wild Animal Health, Copenhagen Zoo, Roskildevej 38, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Zoology and Entomology, University of Fort Hare Alice Campus, Ring Road, Alice 5700, South Africa
dc.identifier.volume19
dc.identifier.issue186
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
kaust.grant.numberKAUST Sensor Initiative
dc.date.accepted2021-12-08
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-20T07:23:57Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitKAUST Sensor Initiative


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
rsif.2021.0692.pdf
Size:
1.459Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Publisher's version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.