Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSilva, Luis
dc.contributor.authorCalleja Cortes, Maria de Lluch
dc.contributor.authorHuete-Stauffer, Tamara M.
dc.contributor.authorIvetic, Snjezana
dc.contributor.authorAnsari, Mohd Ikram
dc.contributor.authorViegas, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Xose Anxelu G.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-05T11:22:31Z
dc.date.available2022-01-05T11:22:31Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-03
dc.identifier.citationSilva, L., Calleja, M. L., Huete-Stauffer, T. M., Ivetic, S., Ansari, M. I., Viegas, M., & Morán, X. A. G. (2022). Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton Growth and Physiological Properties in Red Sea Tropical Shallow Ecosystems With Different Dissolved Organic Matter Sources. Frontiers in Microbiology, 12. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2021.784325
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2021.784325
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/674877
dc.description.abstractDespite the key role of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the biogeochemistry of tropical coastal waters, their dynamics have been poorly investigated in relation to the different dissolved organic matter (DOM) pools usually available. In this study we conducted four seasonal incubations of unfiltered and predator-free seawater (Community and Filtered treatment, respectively) at three Red Sea coastal sites characterized by different dominant DOM sources: Seagrass, Mangrove, and Phytoplankton. Bacterial abundance, growth and physiological status were assessed by flow cytometry and community composition by 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The Seagrass site showed the highest initial abundances (6.93 ± 0.30 × 10$^{5}$ cells mL$^{–1}$), coincident with maximum DOC concentrations (>100 μmol C L$^{–1}$), while growth rates peaked at the Mangrove site (1.11 ± 0.09 d$^{–1}$) and were consistently higher in the Filtered treatment. The ratio between the Filtered and Community maximum bacterial abundance (a proxy for top-down control by protistan grazers) showed minimum values at the Seagrass site (1.05 ± 0.05) and maximum at the Phytoplankton site (1.24 ± 0.30), suggesting protistan grazing was higher in open waters, especially in the first half of the year. Since the Mangrove and Seagrass sites shared a similar bacterial diversity, the unexpected lack of bacterial response to predators removal at the latter site should be explained by differences in DOM characteristics. Nitrogen-rich DOM and fluorescent protein-like components were significantly associated with enhanced specific growth rates along the inshore-offshore gradient. Our study confirms the hypotheses that top–down factors control bacterial standing stocks while specific growth rates are bottom-up controlled in representative Red Sea shallow, oligotrophic ecosystems.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe gratefully acknowledge Najwa Al-Otaibi, Eman I. Sabbagh, and Abbrar Labban, who aided us with laboratory and fieldwork. We are also grateful to the Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab (CMOR) for their diligent fieldwork assistance.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding This project was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through the baseline research funding provided to XAGM. This research was undertaken in accordance with the policies and procedures of KAUST. Permissions relevant for KAUST to undertake the research have been obtained from the applicable governmental agencies in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SA
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2021.784325/full
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in Microbiology
dc.titleHeterotrophic Bacterioplankton Growth and Physiological Properties in Red Sea Tropical Shallow Ecosystems With Different Dissolved Organic Matter Sources
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.contributor.departmentField & Lab Research Support
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Microbiology
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Climate Geochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biosciences, Integral University, Lucknow, India
dc.contributor.institutionCentro Oceanográfico de Gijón/Xixón (IEO, CSIC), Gijón, Spain
dc.identifier.volume12
kaust.personSilva, Luis
kaust.personCalleja Cortes, Maria de Lluch
kaust.personHuete-Stauffer, Tamara M.
kaust.personIvetic, Snjezana
kaust.personAnsari, Mohd Ikram
kaust.personViegas, Miguel
kaust.personMoran, Xose Anxelu G.
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-05T11:23:48Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
fmicb-12-784325.pdf
Size:
3.666Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Publisher's Version/PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record