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dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Lloyd W.
dc.contributor.authorGeraldi, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorPope, Edward C.
dc.contributor.authorHolton, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorLurgi, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Rory P.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T06:48:53Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T06:48:53Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-07
dc.date.submitted2021-01-23
dc.identifier.citationHopkins, L. W., Geraldi, N. R., Pope, E. C., Holton, M. D., Lurgi, M., Duarte, C. M., & Wilson, R. P. (2021). Testing angular velocity as a new metric for metabolic demands of slow-moving marine fauna: a case study with Giant spider conchs Lambis truncata. Animal Biotelemetry, 9(1). doi:10.1186/s40317-021-00255-x
dc.identifier.issn2050-3385
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40317-021-00255-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/671114
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Quantifying metabolic rate in free-living animals is invaluable in understanding the costs of behaviour and movement for individuals and communities. Dynamic body acceleration (DBA) metrics, such as vectoral DBA (VeDBA), are commonly used as proxies for the energy expenditure of movement but are of limited applicability for slow-moving species. It has recently been suggested that metrics based on angular velocity might be better suited to characterise their energetics. We investigated whether a novel metric—the ‘Rate of change of Rotational Movement (RocRM)’, calculated from the vectoral sum of change in the pitch, roll and yaw/heading axes over a given length of time, is a suitable proxy for energy expenditure. Results We found that RocRM can be used as an alternative energy expenditure proxy in a slow-moving benthic invertebrate. Eleven Giant spider conchs Lambis truncata (collected in the Red Sea) were instrumented with multiple channel (Daily Diary) tags and kept in sealed chambers for 5 h while their oxygen consumption, V̇O2, was measured. We found RocRM to be positively correlated with V̇O2, this relationship being affected by the time-step (i.e. the range of the calculated differential) of the RocRM. Time steps of 1, 5, 10 and 60 s yielded an explained variability of between 15 and 31%. The relationship between V̇O2 and VeDBA was not statistically significant, suggesting RocRM to provide more accurate estimations of metabolic rates in L. truncata. Conclusions RocRM proved to be a statistically significant predictor of V̇O2 where VeDBA did not, validating the approach of using angular-based metrics over dynamic movement-based ones for slower moving animals. Further work is required to validate the use of RocRM for other species, particularly in animals with minimally dynamic movement, to better understand energetic costs of whole ecosystems. Unexplained variability in the models might be a consequence of the methodology used, but also likely a result of conch activity that does not manifest in movement of the shell. Additionally, density plots of mean RocRM at each time-step suggest differences in movement scales, which may collectively be useful as a species fingerprint of movement going forward.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was Funded by a KAUST-funded studentship from the Office for Sponsored Research, as part of the CAASE project and overarching Sensor Initiative.
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.urlhttps://animalbiotelemetry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40317-021-00255-x
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleTesting angular velocity as a new metric for metabolic demands of slow-moving marine fauna: a case study with Giant spider conchs Lambis truncata
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.identifier.journalAnimal Biotelemetry
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biosciences, Singleton Campus, Swansea University, Wallace Building, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Computing Science, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
dc.identifier.volume9
dc.identifier.issue1
kaust.personGeraldi, Nathan
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.date.accepted2021-07-15
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-08T06:50:17Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitSensor Initiative
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitSponsored Research
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOSR
dc.date.published-online2021-09-07
dc.date.published-print2021-12


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.