Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSynek, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorRawat, Anamika
dc.contributor.authorL'Haridon, Floriane
dc.contributor.authorWeisskopf, Laure
dc.contributor.authorSaad, Maged
dc.contributor.authorHirt, Heribert
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-06T07:45:37Z
dc.date.available2021-09-06T07:45:37Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-15
dc.date.submitted2021-06-15
dc.identifier.citationSynek, L., Rawat, A., L’Haridon, F., Weisskopf, L., Saad, M. M., & Hirt, H. (2021). Multiple strategies of plant colonization by beneficial endophytic Enterobacter sp. SA187. Environmental Microbiology. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.15747
dc.identifier.issn1462-2912
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920
dc.identifier.pmid34472197
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.15747
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/670960
dc.description.abstractAlthough many endophytic plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria have been identified, relatively little is still known about the mechanisms by which they enter plants and promote plant growth. The beneficial endophyte Enterobacter sp. SA187 was shown to maintain productivity of crops in extreme agricultural conditions. Here we present that roots of its natural host (Indigofera argentea), alfalfa, tomato, wheat, barley and Arabidopsis are all efficiently colonized by SA187. Detailed analysis of the colonization process in Arabidopsis showed that colonization already starts during seed germination, where seed-coat mucilage supports SA187 proliferation. The meristematic zone of growing roots attracts SA187, allowing epiphytic colonization in the elongation zone. Unlike primary roots, lateral roots are significantly less epiphytically colonized by SA187. Root endophytic colonization was found to occur by passive entry of SA187 at lateral-root bases. However, SA187 also actively penetrates the root epidermis by enzymatic disruption of plant cell wall material. In contrast to roots, endophytic colonization of shoots occurs via stomata, whereby SA187 can actively re-open stomata similarly to pathogenic bacteria. In summary, several entry strategies were identified that allow SA187 to establish itself as a beneficial endophyte in several plant species, supporting it's use as a plant growth-promoting bacterium in agriculture systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank to I. Blilou (KAUST) for critical reading of the manuscript. This work was supported by the KAUST project No. BAS/1/1062-01-01 to H.H. and by the Swiss National Science Foundation project No. 31003A_179310 to L.W. We thank to developers of FIJI and Inkscape software
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1462-2920.15747
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environmental Microbiology
dc.titleMultiple strategies of plant colonization by beneficial endophytic Enterobacter sp. SA187
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agriculture
dc.contributor.departmentHirt Lab
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Microbiology
dc.rights.embargodate2022-09-01
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Experimental Botany Czech Academy of Sciences Rozvojova 263, 165 02 Prague Czech Republic
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology University of Fribourg CH-1700 Fribourg Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionMax F. Perutz Laboratories University of Vienna Dr. Bohrgasse 9, 1030 Vienna Austria
kaust.personSynek, Lukas
kaust.personRawat, Anamika
kaust.personSaad, Maged
kaust.personHirt, Heribert
kaust.grant.numberBAS/1/1062-01-01
dc.date.accepted2021-08-25
refterms.dateFOA2021-09-06T07:46:54Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitBAS
dc.date.published-online2021-09-15
dc.date.published-print2021-10


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
1462-2920.15747.pdf
Size:
5.165Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Accepted manuscript
Embargo End Date:
2022-09-01

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record