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dc.contributor.authorDehwah, Abdullah H. A.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Donald M.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sheng
dc.contributor.authorMallon, Francis
dc.contributor.authorBatang, Zenon B.
dc.contributor.authorAlshahri, Abdullah
dc.contributor.authorTsegaye, Seneshaw
dc.contributor.authorHegy, Michael
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, Thomas M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-12T12:27:08Z
dc.date.available2021-07-12T12:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationDehwah, A. H. A., Anderson, D. M., Li, S., Mallon, F. L., Batang, Z., Alshahri, A. H., … Missimer, T. M. (2020). Understanding transparent exopolymer particle occurrence and interaction with algae, bacteria, and the fractions of natural organic matter in the Red Sea: implications for seawater desalination. DESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT, 192, 78–96. doi:10.5004/dwt.2020.25942
dc.identifier.issn1944-3986
dc.identifier.issn1944-3994
dc.identifier.doi10.5004/dwt.2020.25942
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/670152
dc.description.abstractBinding of particulate and dissolved organic matter in the water column by marine gels allows the sinking and cycling of organic matter into the deeper water of the Red Sea and other marine water bodies. A series of four offshore profiles were made at which concentrations of bacteria, algae, particulate transparent exopolymer particles (p-TEP), colloidal transparent exopolymer particles (c-TEP), and the fractions of natural organic matter (NOM), including biopolymers, humic substances, building blocks, low molecular weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids were measured to depths ranging from 90 to 300 m. It was found that a statistically-significant relationship occurs between the concentrations of p-TEP with bacteria and algae, but not with total organic carbon (TOC) in the offshore profiles. Variation in the biopolymer fraction of NOM in relationship to TEP and bacteria suggests that extra-cellular discharges of polysaccharides and proteins from the bacteria and algae are occurring without immediate abiotic assembly into p-TEP. In the water column below the photic zone, TOC, bacteria, and biopolymers show a generally common rate of reduction in concentration, but p-TEP decreases at a diminished rate, showing that it persists in moving organic carbon deeper into the water column despite consumption by bacteria. The data presented herein are the first to link TEP concentrations in the Red Sea with the fractions of NOM as measured using liquid chromatography organic carbon detection (LCOCD) technology. The oceanographic and water quality investigations show the sea-water used for reverse osmosis desalination from the nearshore or offshore would yield nearly equal treatment challenges. Use of deep water intake systems to obtain seawater with reduced p-TEP and bacteria concentrations would not significantly impact treatment if it would be feasible which is not.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe offshore sample collection was provided by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Coastal and Marine Resources Core Laboratory. Analytical work was funded by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. Support for DMA was provided by the National Science Foundation (Grants OCE-0850421 OCE-0430724, OCE-0911031, and OCE-1314642) and National Institutes of Health (NIEHS-1P50-ES021923-01) through the Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health.
dc.publisherDesalination Publications
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.deswater.com/DWT_abstracts/vol_192/192_2020_78.pdf
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to DESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT
dc.subjectTransparent exopolymer particles
dc.subjectNatural organic matter
dc.subjectBiofouling
dc.subjectRed Sea
dc.subjectSeawater reverse osmosis desalination
dc.titleUnderstanding transparent exopolymer particle occurrence and interaction with algae, bacteria, and the fractions of natural organic matter in the Red Sea: implications for seawater desalination
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Center (WDRC), Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Operations
dc.contributor.departmentField & Lab Research Support
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.identifier.journalDESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT
dc.identifier.wosutWOS:000554970800008
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDesalination Technologies Research Institute (DTRI), Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC), P.O. Box: 8328, Al-Jubail, 31951, Saudi Arabia
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, 02543, USA
dc.contributor.institutionGuangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, CAS, Haibin Road #1121, Nansha District, Guangzhou, 511458, China
dc.contributor.institutionQingdao Yonglixing Water Purification Technology Ltd. Company, Room 605, Building B, Miaoling Road #36, Laoshan District, Qingdao, China
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental and Civil Engineering, U.A. Whitake College of Engineering, 10501 FGCU Boulevard, Fort Myers, FL, 33965-6565, USA
dc.contributor.institutionEmergent Technologies Institute, U.A. Whitaker College of Engineering, 16301 Innovation Lane, Fort Myers, FL, 33913, USA
dc.identifier.volume192
dc.identifier.pages78-96
kaust.personDehwah, Abdullah H. A.
kaust.personLi, Sheng
kaust.personMallon, Francis
kaust.personBatang, Zenon B.
kaust.personAlshahri, Abdullah Hassan Mohammed
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85090412061


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