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dc.contributor.authorAjioka, James W.
dc.contributor.authorSibley, L. David
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-30T07:03:30Z
dc.date.available2021-06-30T07:03:30Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationAjioka, J. W., & Sibley, L. D. (2014). Development and Application of Classical Genetics in Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasma Gondii, 551–576. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-396481-6.00016-7
dc.identifier.isbn9780123964816
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-396481-6.00016-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/669840
dc.description.abstractToxoplasma gondii undergoes its sexual phase within the feline intestine. The sexual stages have been an important tool for understanding the biology of the parasite using forward genetics approaches. Genetic crosses were performed by feeding cats bradyzoites from T. gondii strains that differ in virulence and drug resistance. Using progeny from these crosses, the genes responsible for virulence and other biologically important phenotypes have been mapped using classical forward genetic techniques. This chapter reviews the principles of forward genetics in T. gondii and illustrates how the classical genetics approach enabled identification of Toxoplasma virulence genes including the ROP family of rhoptry kinases and pseudokinases. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe National Institutes of Health (USA), United States Department of Agriculture (USA), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (USA), American Heart Association (USA), Wellcome Trust (UK), King Abdulla University of Science and Technology (KAUST), and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK) have supported work in the authors’ laboratories.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/B9780123964816000167
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Elsevier
dc.titleDevelopment and Application of Classical Genetics in Toxoplasma gondii
dc.typeBook Chapter
dc.eprint.versionPre-print
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Pathology, Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, United States
dc.identifier.pages551-576
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-84904083941


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