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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jinzhen
dc.contributor.authorSheng, Hongyuan
dc.contributor.authorRoss, R. Dominic
dc.contributor.authorHan, Jiecai
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xianjie
dc.contributor.authorSong, Bo
dc.contributor.authorJin, Song
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-30T06:48:08Z
dc.date.available2021-05-30T06:48:08Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-24
dc.date.submitted2020-10-04
dc.identifier.citationHuang, J., Sheng, H., Ross, R. D., Han, J., Wang, X., Song, B., & Jin, S. (2021). Modifying redox properties and local bonding of Co3O4 by CeO2 enhances oxygen evolution catalysis in acid. Nature Communications, 12(1). doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23390-8
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-021-23390-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/669284
dc.description.abstractAbstractDeveloping efficient and stable earth-abundant electrocatalysts for acidic oxygen evolution reaction is the bottleneck for water splitting using proton exchange membrane electrolyzers. Here, we show that nanocrystalline CeO2 in a Co3O4/CeO2 nanocomposite can modify the redox properties of Co3O4 and enhances its intrinsic oxygen evolution reaction activity, and combine electrochemical and structural characterizations including kinetic isotope effect, pH- and temperature-dependence, in situ Raman and ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses to understand the origin. The local bonding environment of Co3O4 can be modified after the introduction of nanocrystalline CeO2, which allows the Co$^{III}$ species to be easily oxidized into catalytically active Co$^{IV}$ species, bypassing the potential-determining surface reconstruction process. Co3O4/CeO2 displays a comparable stability to Co3O4 thus breaks the activity/stability tradeoff. This work not only establishes an efficient earth-abundant catalysts for acidic oxygen evolution reaction, but also provides strategies for designing more active catalysts for other reactions.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work is partially supported by University of Wisconsin–Madison UW2020 Initiative and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) OSR-2017-CRG6-3453.02. J. Z. H. thanks the China Scholarship Council (CSC) for fellowship support. B. S. thanks Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Grant No. 51672057, 52072085, and 51722205 for support. H. S., R. D. R., and S. J. also thank the support from US NSF CHE-1955074. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The XAS experiments were performed at the APS Beamline 10-BM-B. The authors acknowledge use of facilities and instrumentation at the UW-Madison Wisconsin Centers for Nanoscale Technology partially supported by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (DMR-1720415).
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-23390-8
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleModifying redox properties and local bonding of Co3O4 by CeO2 enhances oxygen evolution catalysis in acid
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, USA
dc.identifier.volume12
dc.identifier.issue1
kaust.grant.numberOSR-2017-CRG6-3453.02
dc.date.accepted2021-04-27
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitCRG
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOSR


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder