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dc.contributor.authorCornelissen, E. R.
dc.contributor.authorHarmsen, D. J.H.
dc.contributor.authorBlankert, Bastiaan
dc.contributor.authorWessels, L. P.
dc.contributor.authorvan der Meer, W. G.J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-26T07:51:36Z
dc.date.available2021-04-26T07:51:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-13
dc.date.submitted2021-01-18
dc.identifier.citationCornelissen, E. R., Harmsen, D. J. H., Blankert, B., Wessels, L. P., & van der Meer, W. G. J. (2021). Effect of minimal pre-treatment on reverse osmosis using surface water as a source. Desalination, 509, 115056. doi:10.1016/j.desal.2021.115056
dc.identifier.issn0011-9164
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.desal.2021.115056
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/668943
dc.description.abstractReverse osmosis is increasingly used in drinking water supply for treatment of fresh water sources which can directly result in high quality water. In practice reverse osmosis is never applied directly on fresh water sources, predominantly because of the occurrence of membrane fouling. Strategies to control membrane fouling in reverse osmosis without expensive and extensive pre-treatment include low flux operation, increase cross-flow velocities and improved (periodic) hydraulic cleaning. The objective of this research is to technically and economically compare minimal pre-treated reverse osmosis to state-of-the art ultrafiltration pre-treated reverse osmosis in surface water treatment to obtain high quality water. A parallel reverse osmosis system with six parallel 2540-type spiral wound membrane elements has been systematically operated during several months with only screens pre-treatment before reverse osmosis. A minimal pre-treated reverse osmosis system using only screens on surface water did not result in stable reverse osmosis operation, however, the ultrafiltration pre-treated reverse osmosis system also failed in the longer run. Lowering the membrane flux from 25 L/m2.h to 10 L/m2.h in minimal pre-treated RO resulted in an approximately 10-fold decrease of the membrane fouling rate, while not influencing the pressure drop increase. Periodical air water cleaning in minimal pre-treated RO resulted in an approximately 4-fold reduction of the spacer clogging rate, while not affecting the membrane fouling rate. The total cost of a minimal pre-treated low flux (10 L/m2.h) operated RO was significantly lower (0.46 €/m3) compared to state-of-the-art UF pre-treated RO at normal flux (25 L/m2.h) (1.21 €/m3). The cost difference in financial space provides an opportunity to develop minimal pre-treated RO systems with improved control of membrane fouling and spacer clogging.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis activity is co-financed with PPS-funding from the Topconsortia for Knowledge & Innovation (TKI's) of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate. Harry van Wegen and Sidney Meijering (KWR, The Netherlands) are acknowledged for their help during the construction of the pilot. Peter Wessels was working for WE Consult during the research described in this work.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0011916421001272
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Desalination. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Desalination, [509, , (2021-04-13)] DOI: 10.1016/j.desal.2021.115056 . © 2021. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectReverse osmosis
dc.subjectPre-treatment
dc.subjectAir water cleaning
dc.subjectDrinking water treatment
dc.titleEffect of minimal pre-treatment on reverse osmosis using surface water as a source
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalDesalination
dc.rights.embargodate2023-04-12
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionKWR Water Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, 3430BB Nieuwegein, the Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionParticle and Interfacial Technology Group, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionSingapore Membrane Technology Centre, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One #06-08, Singapore 637141, Singapore
dc.contributor.institutionOasen Drinking Water Company, Nieuwe Gouwe O.Z 3, 2801SB Gouda, the Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Twente, Building Meander, Science and Technology, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, the Netherlands
dc.identifier.volume509
dc.identifier.pages115056
kaust.personBlankert, Bastiaan
dc.date.accepted2021-03-08
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85103940670
dc.date.published-online2021-04-13
dc.date.published-print2021-08


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