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dc.contributor.authorJesus, Hugo Emiliano de
dc.contributor.authorCarreira, Renato S.
dc.contributor.authorPaiva, Simone S. M.
dc.contributor.authorMassone, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorEnrich-Prast, Alex
dc.contributor.authorPeixoto, Raquel S.
dc.contributor.authorRodrigues, Jorge L. Mazza
dc.contributor.authorLee, Charles K.
dc.contributor.authorCary, Craig
dc.contributor.authorRosado, Alexandre S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-22T09:00:58Z
dc.date.available2021-03-22T09:00:58Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-16
dc.date.submitted2021-02-14
dc.identifier.citationJesus, H. E. de, Carreira, R. S., Paiva, S. S. M., Massone, C., Enrich-Prast, A., Peixoto, R. S., … Rosado, A. S. (2021). Microbial Succession under Freeze–Thaw Events and Its Potential for Hydrocarbon Degradation in Nutrient-Amended Antarctic Soil. Microorganisms, 9(3), 609. doi:10.3390/microorganisms9030609
dc.identifier.issn2076-2607
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/microorganisms9030609
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/668194
dc.description.abstractThe polar regions have relatively low richness and diversity of plants and animals, and the basis of the entire ecological chain is supported by microbial diversity. In these regions, understanding the microbial response against environmental factors and anthropogenic disturbances is essential to understand patterns better, prevent isolated events, and apply biotechnology strategies. The Antarctic continent has been increasingly affected by anthropogenic contamination, and its constant temperature fluctuations limit the application of clean recovery strategies, such as bioremediation. We evaluated the bacterial response in oil-contaminated soil through a nutrient-amended microcosm experiment using two temperature regimes: (i) 4 °C and (ii) a freeze–thaw cycle (FTC) alternating between −20 and 4 °C. Bacterial taxa, such as Myxococcales, Chitinophagaceae, and Acidimicrobiales, were strongly related to the FTC. Rhodococcus was positively related to contaminated soils and further stimulated under FTC conditions. Additionally, the nutrient-amended treatment under the FTC regime enhanced bacterial groups with known biodegradation potential and was efficient in removing hydrocarbons of diesel oil. The experimental design, rates of bacterial succession, and level of hydrocarbon transformation can be considered as a baseline for further studies aimed at improving bioremediation strategies in environments affected by FTC regimes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ), Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), and KAUST (BAS/1/1096-01-01).
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2076-2607/9/3/609
dc.rightsThis article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleMicrobial Succession under Freeze–Thaw Events and Its Potential for Hydrocarbon Degradation in Nutrient-Amended Antarctic Soil
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC), Division of Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering (BESE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia
dc.identifier.journalMicroorganisms
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Molecular Microbial Ecology, Institute of Microbiology Paulo de Góes (IMPG), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-901, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Marine and Environmental Studies, Department of Chemistry, PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, 22541-041, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionMultiuser Unit of Environmental Analysis, Institute of Biology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-902, Brazil;
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Thematic Studies-Environmental Change, Linköping University, 58183, Linköping, Sweden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA;
dc.contributor.institutionICTAR-The International Centre for Terrestrial Antarctic Research, University of Waikato, 3216, Hamilton, New Zealand;
dc.identifier.volume9
dc.identifier.issue3
dc.identifier.pages609
kaust.personPeixoto, Raquel S.
kaust.personRosado, Alexandre S.
kaust.grant.numberBAS/1/1096-01-01
dc.date.accepted2021-03-06
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85102555018
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-22T10:23:03Z


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