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dc.contributor.authorSantos, João D.
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Christoph F.J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-21T10:20:43Z
dc.date.available2021-03-21T10:20:43Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationSantos, J. D., & Meyer, C. F. J. (2017). Data from: Dispersal and group formation dynamics in a rare and endangered temperate forest bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus, Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) (Version 1) [Data set]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/DRYAD.RC504
dc.identifier.doi10.5061/dryad.rc504
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/668155
dc.description.abstractFor elusive mammals like bats, colonization of new areas and colony formation are poorly understood, as is their relationship with the genetic structure of populations. Understanding dispersal and group formation behaviors is critical not only for a better comprehension of mammalian social dynamics, but also for guiding conservation efforts of rare and endangered species. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we studied patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation among and within breeding colonies of giant noctule bats (Nyctalus lasiopterus), their relation to a new colony still in formation, and the impact of this ongoing process on the regionwide genetic makeup. Nuclear differentiation among colonies was relatively low and mostly nonsignificant. Mitochondrial variation followed this pattern, contrasting with findings for other temperate bat species. Our results suggest that this may indicate a recent population expansion. On average, female giant noctules were not more closely related to other colony members than to foreign individuals. This was also true for members of the newly forming colony and those of another, older group sampled shortly after its formation, suggesting that contrary to findings for other temperate bats, giant noctule colonies are not founded by relatives. However, mother–daughter pairs were found in the same populations more often than expected under random dispersal. Given this indication of philopatry, the lack of mitochondrial differentiation among most colonies in the region is probably due to the combination of a recent population expansion and group formation events.
dc.publisherDryad
dc.relation.urlhttp://datadryad.org/stash/dataset/doi:10.5061/dryad.rc504
dc.subjectmicrosatellites
dc.subjectrelatedness
dc.subjectNyctalus lasiopterus
dc.subjectmtDNA
dc.subjectcolony formation
dc.subjectPhilopatry
dc.titleData from: Dispersal and group formation dynamics in a rare and endangered temperate forest bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus, Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)
dc.typeDataset
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Desert Agriculture, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955, Saudi Arabia
dc.contributor.departmentDesert Agriculture Initiative
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes (cE3c), Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon, Portugal
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Science, Engineering and Environment, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, United Kingdom
kaust.personSantos, João D.
dc.relation.issupplementtoDOI:10.1016/j.baae.2021.02.001
display.relations<b>Is Supplement To:</b><br/> <ul><li><i>[Article]</i> <br/> Santos, J. D., Meyer, C. F. J., Ibáñez, C., Popa-Lisseanu, A. G., & Juste, J. (2021). Kin structure and roost fidelity in greater noctule bats. Basic and Applied Ecology, 51, 20–29. doi:10.1016/j.baae.2021.02.001. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2021.02.001" >10.1016/j.baae.2021.02.001</a> Handle: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/667511" >10754/667511</a></a></li></ul>


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