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dc.contributor.authorZheng, J.
dc.contributor.authorWu, X.
dc.contributor.authorFang, F.
dc.contributor.authorLi, J.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Z.
dc.contributor.authorXiao, H.
dc.contributor.authorZhu, J.
dc.contributor.authorPain, C. C.
dc.contributor.authorLinden, P. F.
dc.contributor.authorXiang, B.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-01T05:48:53Z
dc.date.available2021-03-01T05:48:53Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-19
dc.identifier.citationZheng, J., Wu, X., Fang, F., Li, J., Wang, Z., Xiao, H., … Xiang, B. (2021). Numerical study of COVID-19 spatial–temporal spreading in London. Physics of Fluids, 33(4), 046605. doi:10.1063/5.0048472
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/5.0048472
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/667723
dc.description.abstractRecent study reported that an aerosolised virus (COVID-19) can survive in the air for a few hours. It is highly possible that people get infected with the disease by breathing and contact with items contaminated by the aerosolised virus. However, the aerosolised virus transmission and trajectories in various meteorological environments remain unclear. This paper has investigated the movement of aerosolised viruses from a high concentration source across a dense urban area. The case study looks at the highly air polluted areas of London: University College Hospital (UCH) and King Cross and St Pancras International Station (KCSPI). We explored the spread and decay of COVID-19 released from the hospital and railway stations with the prescribed meteorological conditions. The study has three key findings: the primary result is that it is possible for the virus to travel from meters up to hundred meters from the source location. The secondary finding shows viruses released into the atmosphere from entry and exit points at KCSPI remain trapped within a small radial distance of < 50m. This strengthens the case for the use of face coverings to reduce the infection rate. The final finding shows that there are different levels of risk at various door locations for UCH, depending on which door is used there can be a higher concentration of COVID-19. Although our results are based on London, since the fundamental knowledge processes are the same, our study can be further extended to other locations (especially the highly air polluted areas) in the world.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the National Key Research and Development Program of China [Grant Number 2017YFC0209800], the UK’s the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council fund for Managing Air for Greener Inner Cities (MAGIC) [Grant Number EP/N010221/1] and INHALE (Grant Number EP/T003189/1), the Royal Society [Grant Number IEC/ NS- FC/170563] and Rapid Assistance in Modelling the Pandemic (RAMP) project in the UK, the joint KAUST-Imperial project [Grant Number EACPR_P83206], the National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant Number 41705104], Ningbo Science and Technology Plan Project [Grant Number 2017C50004] and the China Scholarship Council [Grant Number 201904910136]
dc.publisherarXiv
dc.relation.urlhttps://arxiv.org/pdf/2102.09902.pdf
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to arXiv
dc.titleNumerical study of COVID-19 spatial-temporal spreading in London
dc.typePreprint
dc.eprint.versionPre-print
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, 361021, China
dc.contributor.institutionApplied Modelling and Computation Group, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionInternational Center for Climate and Environment Sciences, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, England CB3 0WA, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionState Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
dc.contributor.institutionWilson’s School, Mollison Drive, Wallington, Surrey, SM6 9JW, United Kingdom
dc.identifier.arxivid2102.09902
kaust.grant.numberEACPR_P83206


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