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dc.contributor.authorLe Roy, Nathalie
dc.contributor.authorGanot, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorAranda, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorAllemand, Denis
dc.contributor.authorTambutté, Sylvie
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-12T13:53:04Z
dc.date.available2021-01-12T13:53:04Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-11
dc.date.submitted2020-02-24
dc.identifier.citationLe Roy, N., Ganot, P., Aranda, M., Allemand, D., & Tambutté, S. (2021). The skeletome of the red coral Corallium rubrum indicates an independent evolution of biomineralization process in octocorals. BMC Ecology and Evolution, 21(1). doi:10.1186/s12862-020-01734-0
dc.identifier.issn2730-7182
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12862-020-01734-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/666879
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The process of calcium carbonate biomineralization has arisen multiple times during metazoan evolution. In the phylum Cnidaria, biomineralization has mostly been studied in the subclass Hexacorallia (i.e. stony corals) in comparison to the subclass Octocorallia (i.e. red corals); the two diverged approximately 600 million years ago. The precious Mediterranean red coral, Corallium rubrum, is an octocorallian species, which produces two distinct high-magnesium calcite biominerals, the axial skeleton and the sclerites. In order to gain insight into the red coral biomineralization process and cnidarian biomineralization evolution, we studied the protein repertoire forming the organic matrix (OM) of its two biominerals. Results We combined High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and transcriptome analysis to study the OM composition of the axial skeleton and the sclerites. We identified a total of 102 OM proteins, 52 are found in the two red coral biominerals with scleritin being the most abundant protein in each fraction. Contrary to reef building corals, the red coral organic matrix possesses a large number of collagen-like proteins. Agrin-like glycoproteins and proteins with sugar-binding domains are also predominant. Twenty-seven and 23 proteins were uniquely assigned to the axial skeleton and the sclerites, respectively. The inferred regulatory function of these OM proteins suggests that the difference between the two biominerals is due to the modeling of the matrix network, rather than the presence of specific structural components. At least one OM component could have been horizontally transferred from prokaryotes early during Octocorallia evolution. Conclusion Our results suggest that calcification of the red coral axial skeleton likely represents a secondary calcification of an ancestral gorgonian horny axis. In addition, the comparison with stony coral skeletomes highlighted the low proportion of similar proteins between the biomineral OMs of hexacorallian and octocorallian corals, suggesting an independent acquisition of calcification in anthozoans.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully thank Anne Haguenauer and Dr. Didier Aurelle from the IMBE/Marseille for the C. rubrum sampling. We would like to thank M. François Rougaignon, President of the Fondation Paul Hamel for his confiance and support. We gratefully thank the reviewers for their constructive analysis of our work that significantly helped to improve this manuscript.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Postdoctoral funding of the Centre Scientifique de Monaco (n°500/685229; Government of Principality of Monaco). Proteomic analysis was supported by the Centre Scientifique de Monaco research program, funded by the Government of Principality of Monaco, and the C. rubrum genome and transcriptome analyses were supported by the Fondation Paul HAMEL.
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.urlhttps://bmcevolbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12862-020-01734-0
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe skeletome of the red coral Corallium rubrum indicates an independent evolution of biomineralization process in octocorals
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.identifier.journalBMC Ecology and Evolution
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionCentre Scientifique de Monaco, 8 Quai Antoine 1er, Monaco, MC, 98000, Monaco.
dc.identifier.volume21
dc.identifier.issue1
kaust.personAranda, Manuel
dc.date.accepted2020-12-13
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-12T13:54:03Z


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.