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dc.contributor.authorRandle, Janna L.
dc.contributor.authorCardenas, Anny
dc.contributor.authorGegner, Hagen
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Maren
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T10:58:38Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T10:58:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-25
dc.date.submitted2020-06-17
dc.identifier.citationRandle, J. L., Cárdenas, A., Gegner, H. M., Ziegler, M., & Voolstra, C. R. (2020). Salinity-Conveyed Thermotolerance in the Coral Model Aiptasia Is Accompanied by Distinct Changes of the Bacterial Microbiome. Frontiers in Marine Science, 7. doi:10.3389/fmars.2020.573635
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2020.573635
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/666310
dc.description.abstractCoral bleaching, i.e., the loss of photosynthetic algal endosymbionts, caused by ocean warming is now among the main factors driving global reef decline, making the elucidation of factors that contribute to thermotolerance important. Recent studies implicate high salinity as a contributing factor in cnidarians, potentially explaining the high thermotolerance of corals from the Arabian Seas. Here we characterized bacterial community composition under heat stress at different salinities using the coral model Aiptasia. Exposure of two Aiptasia host-algal symbiont pairings (H2-SSB01 and CC7-SSA01) to ambient (25°C) and heat stress (34°C) temperatures at low (36 PSU), intermediate (39 PSU), and high (42 PSU) salinities showed that bacterial community composition at high salinity was significantly different, concomitant with reduced bleaching susceptibility in H2-SSB01, not observed in CC7-SSA01. Elucidation of bacteria that showed increased relative abundance at high salinity, irrespective of heat stress, revealed candidate taxa that could potentially contribute to the observed increased thermotolerance. We identified 4 (H2-SSB01) and 3 (CC7-SSA01) bacterial taxa belonging to the orders Alteromonadales (1 OTU), Oligoflexales (1 OTU), Rhizobiales (2 OTUs), and Rhodobacterales (2 OTUs), suggesting that only few bacterial taxa are potential contributors to an increase in thermal tolerance at high salinities. These taxa have previously been implicated in nitrogen and DMSP cycling, processes that are considered to affect thermotolerance. Our study demonstrates microbiome restructuring in symbiotic cnidarians under heat stress at different salinities. As such, it underlines how host-associated bacterial communities adapt to prevailing environmental conditions with putative consequences for the environmental stress tolerance of the emergent metaorganism.
dc.description.sponsorshipJR would like to thank Dr. Caroline Dubé for help with 16S rRNA gene analysis. The authors would like to thank the Bioscience Core Lab (BCL) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology for assistance with sequencing
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SA
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.573635/full
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleSalinity-Conveyed Thermotolerance in the Coral Model Aiptasia Is Accompanied by Distinct Changes of the Bacterial Microbiome
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering, Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Marine Science
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
dc.identifier.volume7
kaust.personRandle, Janna L.
kaust.personCardenas, Anny
kaust.personGegner, Hagen
kaust.personZiegler, Maren
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.date.accepted2020-10-21
dc.relation.issupplementedbybioproject:PRJNA524291
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-09T10:59:31Z
display.relations<b>Is Supplemented By:</b><br/> <ul><li><i>[Bioproject]</i> <br/> Title: Salinity-conveyed thermotolerance in the coral model Aiptasia is accompanied by distinct changes of the bacterial microbiomePublication Date: 2019-02-26. bioproject: <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/?term=PRJNA524291" >PRJNA524291</a> Handle: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/666720" >10754/666720</a></a></li></ul>


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.