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dc.contributor.authorAlammar, Abdulaziz
dc.contributor.authorPark, Sang-Hee
dc.contributor.authorIbrahim, Izwaharyanie
dc.contributor.authorArun, Deepak
dc.contributor.authorHoltzl, Tibor
dc.contributor.authorDumée, Ludovic F.
dc.contributor.authorLim, Hong Ngee
dc.contributor.authorSzekely, Gyorgy
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T10:45:58Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T10:45:58Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-13
dc.identifier.citationAlammar, A., Park, S.-H., Ibrahim, I., Arun, D., Holtzl, T., Dumée, L. F., … Szekely, G. (2020). Architecting neonicotinoid-scavenging nanocomposite hydrogels for environmental remediation. Applied Materials Today, 21, 100878. doi:10.1016/j.apmt.2020.100878
dc.identifier.issn2352-9407
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apmt.2020.100878
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/665993
dc.description.abstractThe ubiquitous presence of neonicotinoid insecticides in the environment poses potential health concerns across all biomes, aquatic systems, and food chains. This global environmental challenge requires robust, advanced materials to efficiently scavenge and remove these harmful neonicotinoids. In this work, we engineered nanocomposite hydrogels based on sustainable cellulose acetate for water treatment. The nanocomposite hydrogels were incorporated with small quantities of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) and graphene oxide (GO). We prepared the hydrogels using green solvents such as Cyrene and MeTHF via simple dropwise phase inversion. High adsorption capacity and fast kinetic behavior toward acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam were observed. We also developed a rapid and sustainable ultrasound-assisted regeneration method for the hydrogels. Molecular dynamics of the complex quaternary system revealed the synergistic effects of the components, and the presence of PIM-1 was found to increase the GO surface area available for neonicotinoid scavenging. We demonstrated the robustness and practicality of the nanocomposites in continuous environmental remediation by using the hydrogels to treat contaminated groundwater from the Adyar river in India. The presented methodology is adaptable to other contaminants in both aqueous environments and organic media.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe graphical abstract and Figs. 1 and 3 were created by Xavier Pita, scientific illustrator at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). AA acknowledges the PhD scholarship from Saudi Aramco. We thank Ali Reza Behzad from the Imaging and Characterization Core Lab at KAUST for assisting with the cryo-SEM measurements. The research reported in this publication was supported by funding from KAUST. TH thanks the Hungarian Government and the European Union, Grant/Award Number: VEKOP-2.1.1-15-2016-00114 for their support.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmt.2020.100878
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Applied Materials Today. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Applied Materials Today, [21, , (2020-11-13)] DOI: 10.1016/j.apmt.2020.100878 . © 2020. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleArchitecting Neonicotinoid-Scavenging Nanocomposite Hydrogels for Environmental Remediation
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center
dc.identifier.journalApplied Materials Today
dc.rights.embargodate2021-11-13
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Sackville street, The Mill, Manchester M1 3BB, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
dc.contributor.institutionSaveetha School of Engineering, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 602105, India
dc.contributor.institutionMTA-BME Computation Driven Chemistry Research Group, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem rkp. 3., Budapest 1111, Hungary
dc.contributor.institutionFurukawa Electric Institute of Technology, Kesmark utca 28/A, Budapest 1158, Hungary
dc.contributor.institutionDeakin University, Geelong, Institute for Frontier Materials, Waurn Ponds, 3216 Victoria, Australia
dc.identifier.volume21
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
dc.identifier.pages100878
pubs.publication-statusPublished
kaust.personPark, Sang-Hee
kaust.personSzekely, Gyorgy
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-17T10:45:58Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitImaging and Characterization Core Lab at KAUST
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitscientific illustrator at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)
dc.date.published-online2020-11-13
dc.date.published-print2020-12


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