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dc.contributor.authorRueger, Theresa
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Hugo B.
dc.contributor.authorBuston, Peter M.
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Naomi M.
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.
dc.contributor.authorJones, G. P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T06:41:06Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T06:41:06Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationRueger, T., Harrison, H., Buston, P., Gardiner, N., Berumen, M., & Jones, G. (2020). Data from: Natal philopatry increases relatedness within groups of coral reef cardinalfish (Version 5) [Data set]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/DRYAD.CZ8W9GJ0Q
dc.identifier.doi10.5061/dryad.cz8w9gj0q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/665923
dc.description.abstractA central issue in evolutionary ecology is how patterns of dispersal influence patterns of relatedness in populations. In terrestrial organisms, limited dispersal of offspring leads to groups of related individuals. In contrast, for most marine organisms, larval dispersal in open waters is thought to minimise kin associations within populations. However, recent molecular evidence and theoretical approaches have shown that limited dispersal, sibling cohesion, and/or differential reproductive success can lead to kin-association and elevated relatedness. Here, we tested the hypothesis that limited dispersal explains small-scale patterns of relatedness in the pajama cardinalfish Sphaeramia nematoptera. We used 19 microsatellite markers to assess parentage of 233 juveniles and pairwise relatedness among 527 individuals from 41 groups in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Our findings support three predictions of the limited dispersal hypothesis: 1) Elevated relatedness within groups, compared to among groups, and elevated relatedness within reefs compared to among reefs; 2) A weak negative correlation of relatedness with distance; 3) More juveniles than would be expected by chance in the same group and the same reef as their parents. We provide the first example for natal philopatry at the group level causing small-scale patterns of genetic relatedness in a marine fish.
dc.publisherDryad
dc.subjectGenetic relatedness
dc.subjectkin cohesion
dc.subjectlimited dispersal
dc.subjectreproductive sweepstakes
dc.subjectnatal philopatry
dc.subjectCardinalfish
dc.titleData from: Natal philopatry increases relatedness within groups of coral reef cardinalfish
dc.typeDataset
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentReef Ecology Lab
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology and Marine Program, Boston University, 5 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville, Australia
kaust.personBerumen, Michael L.
dc.relation.issupplementtoDOI:10.1098/rspb.2020.1133
display.relations<b>Is Supplement To:</b><br/> <ul><li><i>[Article]</i> <br/> Rueger, T., Harrison, H. B., Buston, P. M., Gardiner, N. M., Berumen, M. L., & Jones, G. P. (2020). Natal philopatry increases relatedness within groups of coral reef cardinalfish. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 287(1930), 20201133. doi:10.1098/rspb.2020.1133. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.1133" >10.1098/rspb.2020.1133</a> HANDLE: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/664104">10754/664104</a></li></ul>


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