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dc.contributor.authorGebreyohannes, Abaynesh Yihdego
dc.contributor.authorGeens, T.
dc.contributor.authorKubarev, A.
dc.contributor.authorRoeffaers, M.
dc.contributor.authorNaessens, W.
dc.contributor.authorSwusten, T.
dc.contributor.authorVerbiest, T.
dc.contributor.authorNopens, I.
dc.contributor.authorNunes, Suzana Pereira
dc.contributor.authorVankelecom, I. F.J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-28T12:13:56Z
dc.date.available2020-10-28T12:13:56Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-04
dc.date.submitted2020-07-07
dc.identifier.citationGebreyohannes, A. Y., Geens, T., Kubarev, A., Roeffaers, M., Naessens, W., Swusten, T., … Vankelecom, I. F. J. (2020). Fluorescence-assisted real-time study of magnetically immobilized enzyme stability in a crossflow membrane bioreactor. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 125687. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2020.125687
dc.identifier.issn1873-4359
dc.identifier.issn0927-7757
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.colsurfa.2020.125687
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/665684
dc.description.abstractThe detailed structures and distribution of enzymatically active magnetic-responsive dynamic layers (EnzSP) were investigated for the first time in a crossflow superparamagnetic biocatalytic membrane reactor (XF-BMRSP). The trade-off between a higher mass transfer rate, lower fouling tendency, and preventing washout of the dynamic layer, highly depends on the balance of the various forces that act on the EnzSP. The real-time visual inspection of the biointerface was realized through the design and fabrication of an adapted crossflow system, guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Time-resolved images of the dynamic layer under a broad range of operational conditions was obtained using fluorescence microscopy. The deposition, dispersion and stability of the dynamic layer was mainly governed by the external magnetic force. The shear force did not cause significant particle washout when a buffer solution was recirculated without permeation even under a turbulent flow regime (6.4 cm/s ∼ Re = 5200). The removal of the external magnetic force after initial magnetic immobilization of the EnzSP, or the substitution of a smooth flow velocity by the propagation of an impulse flow, significantly affected the stability of the dynamic layer. Although membrane fouling occurs at the membrane-solution interface, where a laminar flow regime prevails, most membrane fouling models are based on turbulent flow. Therefore, the detailed, time-resolved images obtained here can provide solid foundation for the development of theoretical models that can describe the membrane fouling under the more representative laminar flow regime.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to the Belgian Federal Government for an IAP grant (FS2) and KU Leuven for an IOF-KP grant (13/004)
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0927775720312802
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, [, , (2020-10-04)] DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2020.125687 . © 2020. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleFluorescence-assisted real-time study of magnetically immobilized enzyme stability in a crossflow membrane bioreactor
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentNanostructured Polymeric Membrane Lab
dc.identifier.journalColloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects
dc.rights.embargodate2021-10-04
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionMembrane Technology Group, Division cMACS, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, PO Box 2454, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionBIOMATH Department of Data analysis and mathematical modelling, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent, Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionMolecular Imaging and Photonics, Department of chemistry, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, box 2425, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
dc.identifier.pages125687
kaust.personGebreyohannes, Abaynesh Yihdego
kaust.personNunes, Suzana Pereira
dc.date.accepted2020-09-28
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85092935449
dc.date.published-online2020-10-04
dc.date.published-print2020-10


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