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dc.contributor.authorNauruzbayeva, Jamilya
dc.contributor.authorSun, Zhonghao
dc.contributor.authorGallo Junior, Adair
dc.contributor.authorIbrahim, Mahmoud
dc.contributor.authorSantamarina, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorMishra, Himanshu
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T13:22:23Z
dc.date.available2020-10-22T13:22:23Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-20
dc.date.submitted2019-10-14
dc.identifier.citationNauruzbayeva, J., Sun, Z., Gallo, A., Ibrahim, M., Santamarina, J. C., & Mishra, H. (2020). Electrification at water–hydrophobe interfaces. Nature Communications, 11(1). doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19054-8
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-020-19054-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/665657
dc.description.abstractAbstract The mechanisms leading to the electrification of water when it comes in contact with hydrophobic surfaces remains a research frontier in chemical science. A clear understanding of these mechanisms could, for instance, aid the rational design of triboelectric generators and micro- and nano-fluidic devices. Here, we investigate the origins of the excess positive charges incurred on water droplets that are dispensed from capillaries made of polypropylene, perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-coated glass, and polytetrafluoroethylene. Results demonstrate that the magnitude and sign of electrical charges vary depending on: the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the capillary; the presence/absence of a water reservoir inside the capillary; the chemical and physical properties of aqueous solutions such as pH, ionic strength, dielectric constant and dissolved CO2 content; and environmental conditions such as relative humidity. Based on these results, we deduce that common hydrophobic materials possess surface-bound negative charge. Thus, when these surfaces are submerged in water, hydrated cations form an electrical double layer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the primary role of hydrophobicity is to facilitate water-substrate separation without leaving a significant amount of liquid behind. These results advance the fundamental understanding of water-hydrophobe interfaces and should translate into superior materials and technologies for energy transduction, electrowetting, and separation processes, among others.
dc.description.sponsorshipH.M. and J.C.S. acknowledge funding from KAUST. J.N. and H.M. thank Mrs. Emilie Dauzon (KAUST), who initiated this research through investigating electrification at solid-solid interfaces in HM’s Group as a visiting student in the year 2015. The co-authors thank Mr. Farizal Hakiki for performing permittivity measurements used in Fig. 5b, and Dr. Michael Cusack (KAUST) for scientific editing. The authors thank Mr. Ivan Gromicho, Scientific Illustrator at KAUST, for preparing Fig. 6.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19054-8
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleElectrification at water–hydrophobe interfaces
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentAli I. Al-Naimi Petroleum Engineering Research Center (ANPERC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnergy Resources and Petroleum Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentInterfacial Lab
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.identifier.volume11
dc.identifier.issue1
kaust.personSun, Zhonghao
kaust.personGallo Junior, Adair
kaust.personIbrahim, Mahmoud
kaust.personSantamarina, Carlos
kaust.personMishra, Himanshu
dc.date.accepted2020-09-28
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-22T13:23:12Z
dc.date.published-online2020-10-20
dc.date.published-print2020-12


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.