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dc.contributor.authorOsman, Eslam O.
dc.contributor.authorSuggett, David J.
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.contributor.authorPettay, D. Tye
dc.contributor.authorClark, Dave R.
dc.contributor.authorPogoreutz, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorSampayo, Eugenia M.
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, David J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T13:45:49Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T13:45:49Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationEslam Osman, Suggett, D., Voolstra, C., D. Pettay, Clark, D., Pogoreutz, C., Sampayo, E., Warner, M., & Smith, D. (2020). Coral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities. figshare. https://doi.org/10.6084/M9.FIGSHARE.C.4840233
dc.identifier.doi10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4840233
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/665168
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The capacity of reef-building corals to tolerate (or adapt to) heat stress is a key factor determining their resilience to future climate change. Changes in coral microbiome composition (particularly for microalgal endosymbionts and bacteria) is a potential mechanism that may assist corals to thrive in warm waters. The northern Red Sea experiences extreme temperatures anomalies, yet corals in this area rarely bleach suggesting possible refugia to climate change. However, the coral microbiome composition, and how it relates to the capacity to thrive in warm waters in this region, is entirely unknown. Results We investigated microbiomes for six coral species (Porites nodifera, Favia favus, Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, Xenia umbellata, and Sarcophyton trocheliophorum) from five sites in the northern Red Sea spanning 4° of latitude and summer mean temperature ranges from 26.6 °C to 29.3 °C. A total of 19 distinct dinoflagellate endosymbionts were identified as belonging to three genera in the family Symbiodiniaceae (Symbiodinium, Cladocopium, and Durusdinium). Of these, 86% belonged to the genus Cladocopium, with notably five novel types (19%). The endosymbiont community showed a high degree of host-specificity despite the latitudinal gradient. In contrast, the diversity and composition of bacterial communities of the surface mucus layer (SML)—a compartment particularly sensitive to environmental change—varied significantly between sites, however for any given coral was species-specific. Conclusion The conserved endosymbiotic community suggests high physiological plasticity to support holobiont productivity across the different latitudinal regimes. Further, the presence of five novel algal endosymbionts suggests selection of certain genotypes (or genetic adaptation) within the semi-isolated Red Sea. In contrast, the dynamic composition of bacteria associated with the SML across sites may contribute to holobiont function and broaden the ecological niche. In doing so, SML bacterial communities may aid holobiont local acclimatization (or adaptation) by readily responding to changes in the host environment. Our study provides novel insight about the selective and endemic nature of coral microbiomes along the northern Red Sea refugia.
dc.publisherfigshare
dc.subjectMicrobiology
dc.subjectFOS: Biological sciences
dc.subjectEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject59999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subjectFOS: Earth and related environmental sciences
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subject69999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subjectMarine Biology
dc.subjectInorganic Chemistry
dc.subjectFOS: Chemical sciences
dc.titleCoral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities
dc.typeDataset
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentReef Genomics Lab
dc.contributor.institutionCoral Reef Research Unit, School of Life Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo, 11448, Egypt
dc.contributor.institutionClimate Change Cluster, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2007, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Konstanz, 78457, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine Science and Policy, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE, 19958, USA
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, 4072, Australia
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.
kaust.personPogoreutz, Claudia
dc.relation.issupplementtoDOI:10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5
display.relations<b> Is Supplement To:</b><br/> <ul> <li><i>[Article]</i> <br/> Osman, E. O., Suggett, D. J., Voolstra, C. R., Pettay, D. T., Clark, D. R., Pogoreutz, C., … Smith, D. J. (2020). Coral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities. Microbiome, 8(1). doi:10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5" >10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5</a> HANDLE: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/661436">10754/661436</a></li></ul>


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