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dc.contributor.authorLuong, Thang
dc.contributor.authorDasari, Hari Prasad
dc.contributor.authorHoteit, Ibrahim
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-13T06:42:00Z
dc.date.available2020-05-13T06:42:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-11
dc.date.submitted2019-11-11
dc.identifier.citationLuong, T. M., Dasari, H. P., & Hoteit, I. (2020). Extreme precipitation events are becoming less frequent but more intense over Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Are shifting weather regimes the cause? Atmospheric Science Letters. doi:10.1002/asl.981
dc.identifier.issn1530-261X
dc.identifier.issn1530-261X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asl.981
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/662816
dc.description.abstractThis study analyses the connection between extreme rainfall events in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and synoptic-scale weather patterns over the Arabian Peninsula. Mean rainfall follows a decreasing trend; however, the number of rainy days has increased. Interestingly, extreme rainfall is becoming less frequent but shows an increased intensity. Here we utilize self-organizing maps (SOMs) to identify the weather patterns of the most intense rainy days and the synoptic systems causing extreme rainfall in the Jeddah region. Three main weather patterns that cause heavy rainfall events over Jeddah during the cooler months (November–April) are identified, all reflect tropical-extratropical interactions. Extreme events in the early period (1979–1998) are characterized by a stronger tropical influence and local precipitation patterns, while a stronger extratropical forcing and higher extreme rainfall amounts are spotted in the late period (1999–2018). Our results suggest that in recent decades, the mechanism causing extreme rainfall over the city of Jeddah has shifted toward a weather regime with stronger extratropical influence.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Office of Sponsored Research(OSR) at King Abdullah University of Science and Tech-nology (KAUST) under the Competitive Research Grants(CRG) program Grant # URF/1/3706-01-01. We acknowl-edge all data providers that made their datasets available for this study. The comments from anonymous reviewers substantially improved the quality of the manuscript.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/asl.981
dc.relation.urlhttps://rmets.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1002/asl.981
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleExtreme precipitation events are becoming less frequent but more intense over Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Are shifting weather regimes the cause?
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Fluid Modeling and Prediction Group
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalAtmospheric Science Letters
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
kaust.personLuong, Thang
kaust.personDasari, Hari Prasad
kaust.personHoteit, Ibrahim
dc.date.accepted2020-04-18
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-13T06:42:39Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitCompetitive Research
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOffice of Sponsored Research
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOSR
dc.date.published-online2020-05-11
dc.date.published-print2020-08


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.