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dc.contributor.authorGhude, Sachin D.
dc.contributor.authorKarumuri, Rama Krishna
dc.contributor.authorJena, Chinmay
dc.contributor.authorKulkarni, Rachana
dc.contributor.authorPfister, G. G.
dc.contributor.authorSajjan, Veeresh S.
dc.contributor.authorPithani, Prakash
dc.contributor.authorDebnath, Sreyashi
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Rajesh
dc.contributor.authorUpendra, B.
dc.contributor.authorKulkarni, Santosh H.
dc.contributor.authorLal, D. M.
dc.contributor.authorVander A, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorMahajan, Anoop S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-12T12:57:37Z
dc.date.available2020-02-12T12:57:37Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-23
dc.date.submitted2019-03-18
dc.identifier.citationGhude, S. D., Karumuri, R. K., Jena, C., Kulkarni, R., Pfister, G. G., Sajjan, V. S., … Mahajan, A. S. (2019). What is driving the diurnal variation in tropospheric NO2 columns over a cluster of high emission thermal power plants in India? Atmospheric Environment: X, 100058. doi:10.1016/j.aeaoa.2019.100058
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aeaoa.2019.100058
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/661490
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the diurnal variation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) over a cluster of high emission thermal power plants (HETPPs) in India using two products from satellite-based UV/Visible spectrometers together with a chemistry-transport-model. The different overpass times of the satellite spectrometers: SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) (1030 h LT) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) (1330 h LT)), enable detection of changes in NO2 columns at two different times of the day, providing some insight on its diurnal variation. Observations show elevated tropospheric NO2 columns in the afternoon compared to the morning in the vicinity of the HETPPs (~65% higher), contrary to the expected decrease due to enhanced photochemical loss of NO2 in the afternoon and increased concentrations in the morning due to peak-hour vehicular emissions. The observed diurnal variability was simulated using a regional atmospheric composition model and the deviations in nitrogen oxide (NO), NO2, ozone (O3) and hydroperoxy radical (HO2) between 1030 h and 1330 h within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) were examined. We also examined the vertical and horizontal accumulated tendencies of NO2 (advection) and wind profiles directly over the emission. The results show that the vertical variability of chemical loss processes, driven by a change in vertical mixing of NO2 within the PBL and variability in advection (driven by winds) leads to a net increase in the afternoon NO2 columns over the HETPPs, even if we assume flat emissions throughout the day. These results suggest that meteorology along with PBL evolution affects the diurnal evolution of NO2 columnar abundance over locations with high emissions in India.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the Ministry of Earth Sciences, India for their support. We are grateful to TEMIS (http://www.temis.nl/airpollution/no2.html) making the satellite data used here available. All WRF-Chem model simulations were carried out at IITM, India on the IBM-HPC system ‘Aditya’.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2590162119300619
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.
dc.titleWhat is driving the diurnal variation in tropospheric NO2 columns over a cluster of high emission thermal power plants in India?
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentKing Abdullah University of Science and,Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
dc.identifier.journalAtmospheric Environment: X
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionIndian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pashan, Pune, India
dc.contributor.institutionNational Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, USA
dc.contributor.institutionDept. of Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, India
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Development of Advanced Computing, Pune, India
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, the Netherlands
kaust.personKarumuri, Rama Krishna
dc.date.accepted2019-11-20
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-12T13:03:14Z
dc.date.published-online2019-11-23
dc.date.published-print2020-01


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