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dc.contributor.authorOsman, Eslam O.
dc.contributor.authorSuggett, David J.
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.contributor.authorPettay, D. Tye
dc.contributor.authorClark, Dave R.
dc.contributor.authorPogoreutz, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorSampayo, Eugenia M.
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, David J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-09T13:59:34Z
dc.date.available2020-02-09T13:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-06
dc.date.submitted2019-01-10
dc.identifier.citationOsman, E. O., Suggett, D. J., Voolstra, C. R., Pettay, D. T., Clark, D. R., Pogoreutz, C., … Smith, D. J. (2020). Coral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities. Microbiome, 8(1). doi:10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40168-020-00807-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/661436
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The capacity of reef-building corals to tolerate (or adapt to) heat stress is a key factor determining their resilience to future climate change. Changes in coral microbiome composition (particularly for microalgal endosymbionts and bacteria) is a potential mechanism that may assist corals to thrive in warm waters. The northern Red Sea experiences extreme temperatures anomalies, yet corals in this area rarely bleach suggesting possible refugia to climate change. However, the coral microbiome composition, and how it relates to the capacity to thrive in warm waters in this region, is entirely unknown. RESULTS: We investigated microbiomes for six coral species (Porites nodifera, Favia favus, Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, Xenia umbellata, and Sarcophyton trocheliophorum) from five sites in the northern Red Sea spanning 4° of latitude and summer mean temperature ranges from 26.6 °C to 29.3 °C. A total of 19 distinct dinoflagellate endosymbionts were identified as belonging to three genera in the family Symbiodiniaceae (Symbiodinium, Cladocopium, and Durusdinium). Of these, 86% belonged to the genus Cladocopium, with notably five novel types (19%). The endosymbiont community showed a high degree of host-specificity despite the latitudinal gradient. In contrast, the diversity and composition of bacterial communities of the surface mucus layer (SML)-a compartment particularly sensitive to environmental change-varied significantly between sites, however for any given coral was species-specific. CONCLUSION: The conserved endosymbiotic community suggests high physiological plasticity to support holobiont productivity across the different latitudinal regimes. Further, the presence of five novel algal endosymbionts suggests selection of certain genotypes (or genetic adaptation) within the semi-isolated Red Sea. In contrast, the dynamic composition of bacteria associated with the SML across sites may contribute to holobiont function and broaden the ecological niche. In doing so, SML bacterial communities may aid holobiont local acclimatization (or adaptation) by readily responding to changes in the host environment. Our study provides novel insight about the selective and endemic nature of coral microbiomes along the northern Red Sea refugia.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work is primarily funded by Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education, Cultural Affairs and Missions Sector, PhD grant to E.O. Osman. Also, the contribution of D.J. Suggett was funded through an Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP160100271). Research was further supported by baseline funds to C.R. Voolstra from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and funds to M.E. Warner by the National Science Foundation (grant no.1258065 and 1635695).
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttps://microbiomejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5
dc.relation.urlhttps://microbiomejournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s40168-019-0776-5
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCoral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentReef Genomics Lab
dc.identifier.journalMicrobiome
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionCoral Reef Research Unit, School of Life Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo, 11448, Egypt
dc.contributor.institutionClimate Change Cluster, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2007, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, University of Konstanz, 78457, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine Science and Policy, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, University of Delaware, Lewes, DE, 19958, USA
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, 4072, Australia
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.
kaust.personPogoreutz, Claudia
dc.date.accepted2019-12-12
dc.relation.issupplementedbyDOI:10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4840233
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-09T13:59:58Z
display.relations<b>Is Supplemented By:</b><br/> <ul><li><i>[Dataset]</i> <br/> Eslam Osman, Suggett, D., Voolstra, C., D. Pettay, Clark, D., Pogoreutz, C., Sampayo, E., Warner, M., &amp; Smith, D. (2020). <i>Coral microbiome composition along the northern Red Sea suggests high plasticity of bacterial and specificity of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities</i>. figshare. https://doi.org/10.6084/M9.FIGSHARE.C.4840233. DOI: <a href="https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4840233" >10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4840233</a> Handle: <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/10754/665168" >10754/665168</a></a></li></ul>
dc.date.published-online2020-02-06
dc.date.published-print2020-12


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This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.