Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSmallhorn-West, P. F.
dc.contributor.authorGarvin, J. B.
dc.contributor.authorSlayback, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorDe Carlo, Thomas Mario
dc.contributor.authorGordon, S. E.
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, S. H.
dc.contributor.authorHalafihi, T.
dc.contributor.authorJones, G. P.
dc.contributor.authorBridge, T. C.L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-02T13:37:35Z
dc.date.available2020-01-02T13:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-09
dc.identifier.citationSmallhorn-West, P. F., Garvin, J. B., Slayback, D. A., DeCarlo, T. M., Gordon, S. E., Fitzgerald, S. H., … Bridge, T. C. L. (2019). Coral reef annihilation, persistence and recovery at Earth’s youngest volcanic island. Coral Reefs. doi:10.1007/s00338-019-01868-8
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-019-01868-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/660934
dc.description.abstractThe structure and function of coral reef ecosystems is increasingly compromised by multiple stressors, even in the most remote locations. Severe, acute disturbances such as volcanic eruptions represent extreme events that can annihilate entire reef ecosystems, but also provide unique opportunities to examine ecosystem resilience and recovery. Here, we examine the destruction, persistence and initial recovery of reefs associated with the hydro-magmatic eruption that created Earth’s newest landmass, the Hunga Tonga–Hunga Ha’apai volcanic island. Despite extreme conditions associated with the eruption, impacts on nearby reefs were spatially variable. Importantly, even heavily affected reefs showed signs of rapid recovery driven by high recruitment, likely from local refuges. The remote location and corresponding lack of additional stressors likely contribute to the resilience of Hunga’s reefs, suggesting that in the absence of chronic anthropogenic stressors, coral reefs can be resilient to one of the largest physical disturbances on Earth.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Whale Discoveries, Jason Sheehan and Chancey MacDonald for field support and Robert Pressey for funding. This work was supported by the Australian Research Council Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies and the National Geographic Society.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00338-019-01868-8
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Coral Reefs
dc.titleCoral reef annihilation, persistence and recovery at Earth’s youngest volcanic island
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalCoral Reefs
dc.rights.embargodate2020-12-09
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Biology and Aquaculture, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionNASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
dc.contributor.institutionSSAI/Biospheric Sciences Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771, USA
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Ocean Graduate School, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of science, health, education and engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, 4556, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionBiodiversity and Geosciences Program, Museum of Tropical Queensland, Queensland Museum, Townsville, QLD, 4810, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionClimate Change Cluster, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionMinistry of Fisheries, Sopu, Tongatapu, Tonga
kaust.personDe Carlo, Thomas Mario
dc.date.published-online2019-12-09
dc.date.published-print2020-06


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record