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dc.contributor.authorQashqari, Maryam
dc.contributor.authorGarcias-Bonet, Neus
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marco
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Jenny Marie
dc.contributor.authorDaffonchio, Daniele
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10T13:56:15Z
dc.date.available2019-12-10T13:56:15Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-20
dc.identifier.citationQashqari, M. S., Garcias-Bonet, N., Fusi, M., Booth, J. M., Daffonchio, D., & Duarte, C. M. (2020). High temperature and crab density reduce atmospheric nitrogen fixation in Red Sea mangrove sediments. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 232, 106487. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2019.106487
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecss.2019.106487
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/660511
dc.description.abstractMangrove ecosystems are highly productive and provide important ecosystem services. However, in the Red Sea mangroves are under severe nutrient-limiting conditions, reflected in dwarf plants. The nutrient limitation is especially acute for iron, as verified experimentally, although the low carbon-to-nutrient stoichiometric ratios reported for Red Sea mangrove leaves are indicative of general nutrient depletion. Therefore, atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation in mangrove sediments might be particularly important considering the minimal nitrogen inputs from land. Here, we tested the effect of temperature and crab density on sediment N2 fixation rates in mature and juvenile mangrove (Avicennia marina) stands in the central Red Sea. The average N2 fixation rates (from 0.002 ± 0.002 to 0.46 ± 0.12 mg N m−2 d−1) fall in the low range of N2 fixation rates reported in mangroves elsewhere, which is in agreement with the small size of the mangrove plants. Mature mangrove sediments hold higher N2 fixation rates than the juvenile mangrove sediment, related to a higher sediment organic matter and carbon content. We found a detrimental effect of temperature and crab density on sediment N2 fixation rates. Maximum N2 fixation rates were detected at 28 °C with a sharp decrease at 35 °C. Similarly, high crab-density reduced N2 fixation, likely due to the sediment oxygenation or the grazing of cyanobacteria by crabs. This is supported by i) previously reported higher oxygen concentration and redox around burrows compared to undisturbed sediment and ii) lighter sediment carbon isotopic composition in high crab-density than in low crab-density sediments, indicating a higher contribution of microphytobenthos in the mature sediments supporting low crab-density. Our data document temperature and crab density as factors affecting N2 fixation in the Red Sea mangrove sediments.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through Baseline funding to C.M.D and D.D. D.D. acknowledges KAUST for financial support by the Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) under Award No. OSR-2018-CARF-1973 to the Red Sea Research Center. We thank Vincent Saderne for his help in salinity data acquisition.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272771419304949
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, [[Volume], [Issue], (2019-11-20)] DOI: 10.1016/j.ecss.2019.106487 . © 2019. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleHigh temperature and crab density reduce atmospheric nitrogen fixation in Red Sea mangrove sediments
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.identifier.journalEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
dc.rights.embargodate2021-11-20
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionEdinburgh Napier University, School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh, UK
kaust.personQashqari, Maryam
kaust.personGarcias-Bonet, Neus
kaust.personFusi, Marco
kaust.personBooth, Jenny Marie
kaust.personDaffonchio, Daniele
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
kaust.grant.numberOSR-2018-CARF-1973
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitBaseline fund
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOffice of Sponsored Research (OSR)
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitRed Sea Research Center
dc.date.published-online2019-11-20
dc.date.published-print2020-01


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