Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGeraldi, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorAnton Gamazo, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorSantana-Garcon, Julia
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Scott
dc.contributor.authorMarbà, Nuria
dc.contributor.authorLovelock, Catherine E
dc.contributor.authorApostolaki, Eugenia T
dc.contributor.authorCebrian, Just
dc.contributor.authorKrause-Jensen, Dorte
dc.contributor.authorMartinetto, Paulina
dc.contributor.authorPandolfi, John M
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-08T13:00:42Z
dc.date.available2019-12-08T13:00:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-14
dc.identifier.citationGeraldi, N. R., Anton, A., Santana-Garcon, J., Bennett, S., Marbà, N., Lovelock, C. E., … Duarte, C. M. (2019). Ecological effects of non-native species in marine ecosystems relate to co-occurring anthropogenic pressures. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.14930
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gcb.14930
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/660454
dc.description.abstractPredictors for the ecological effects of non-native species are lacking, even though such knowledge is fundamental to manage non-native species and mitigate their impacts. Current theories suggest that the ecological effects of non-native species may be related to other concomitant anthropogenic stressors, but this has not been tested at a global scale. We combine an exhaustive meta-analysis of the ecological effects of marine non-native species with human footprint proxies to determine whether the ecological changes due to non-native species are modulated by co-occurring anthropogenic impacts. We found that non-native species had greater negative effects on native biodiversity where human population was high and caused reductions in individual performance where cumulative human impacts were large. On this basis we identified several marine ecoregions where non-native species may have the greatest ecological effects, including areas in the Mediterranean Sea and along the northwest coast of the USA. In conclusion, our global assessment suggests co-existing anthropogenic impacts can intensify the ecological effects of non-native species.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through baseline funding to C.M.D., by Horizon 2020 Framework Programme (EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation H2020) (grant no. 659246) to S.B., by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Agencia Estatal de Investigación (Spanish Agencia Estatal de Investigación) (grant no. FJCI – 2016 – 30728) to S.B., by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Agencia Estatal de Investigación (Spanish Agencia Estatal de Investigación) (grant no. CGL 2015 – 71809 – P) to N.M., J.S.-G. and S.B., and by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (grant no. CE 140100020) to J.M.P and others. The authors declare they have no conflict of interest.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14930
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Global change biology
dc.titleEcological effects of non-native species in marine ecosystems relate to co-occurring anthropogenic pressures.
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.identifier.journalGlobal change biology
dc.rights.embargodate2020-11-24
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut Mediterrani d'Estudis Avançats (IMEDEA), CSIC-UIB, Esporles, Spain.
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Oceanography, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
dc.contributor.institutionDauphin Island Sea Laboratory, University of South Alabama, Dauphin Island, USA.
dc.contributor.institutionArctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Bioscience, Aarhus, Denmark.
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratorio de Ecologia, Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (IIMyC) CONICET-UNMdP, Mar de Plata, Argentina.
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
kaust.personGeraldi, Nathan
kaust.personAnton Gamazo, Andrea
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.date.published-online2019-12-14
dc.date.published-print2020-03


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record