Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWang, Yajun
dc.contributor.authorSubedi, Sudeep
dc.contributor.authorde Vries, Harmen
dc.contributor.authorDoornenbal, Pieter
dc.contributor.authorVels, Anton
dc.contributor.authorHensel, Goetz
dc.contributor.authorKumlehn, Jochen
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Paul A.
dc.contributor.authorQi, Xiaoquan
dc.contributor.authorBlilou, Ikram
dc.contributor.authorNiks, Rients E.
dc.contributor.authorKrattinger, Simon G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T06:32:18Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T06:32:18Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-11
dc.identifier.citationWang, Y., Subedi, S., de Vries, H., Doornenbal, P., Vels, A., Hensel, G., … Krattinger, S. G. (2019). Orthologous receptor kinases quantitatively affect the host status of barley to leaf rust fungi. Nature Plants, 5(11), 1129–1135. doi:10.1038/s41477-019-0545-2
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41477-019-0545-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/660346
dc.description.abstractGlobal food security depends on cereal crops with durable disease resistance. Most cereals are colonized by rust fungi, which are pathogens of major significance for global agriculture1. Cereal rusts display a high degree of host specificity and one rust species or forma specialis generally colonizes only one cereal host2. Exploiting the non-host status and transferring non-host resistance genes between cereal crop species has been proposed as a strategy for durable rust resistance breeding. The molecular determinants that define the host status to rusts, however, are largely unknown. Here, we show that orthologous genes at the Rphq2 locus for quantitative leaf rust resistance from cultivated barley3 and Rph22 from wild bulbous barley4 affect the host status to leaf rusts. Both genes encode lectin receptor-like kinases. We transformed Rphq2 and Rph22 into an experimental barley line that has been bred for susceptibility to non-adapted leaf rusts, which allowed us to quantify resistance responses against various leaf rust species. Rphq2 conferred a much stronger resistance to the leaf rust of wild bulbous barley than to the leaf rust adapted to cultivated barley, while for Rph22 the reverse was observed. We hypothesize that adapted leaf rust species mitigate perception by cognate host receptors by lowering ligand recognition. Our results provide an example of orthologous genes that connect the quantitative host with non-host resistance to cereal rusts. Such genes provide a basis to exploit non-host resistance in molecular breeding.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank J. Bucher (Wageningen University & Research) for producing the time-lapse video, Y. Jiang (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology)for advising on the Rphq2/Rph22 functional analyses, and J. Rajaraman (IPK Gatersleben) for providing the plasma membrane marker plasmid. This publication is based on work supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology Office of Sponsored Research under Award No. OSR-CRG2018-3768 (to Y.W. and S.G.K.), the New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited Strategic Science Investment Fund (to P.A.J.), National Natural Science Foundation of China grant no. 31471756 (to X.Q.), and NWO-ALW (file number 849.13.002) as part of the ERA-CAPS project DURESTrit 13.006 (to Y.W.).
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41477-019-0545-2
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nature Plants
dc.titleOrthologous receptor kinases quantitatively affect the host status of barley to leaf rust fungi
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science
dc.contributor.departmentDesert Agriculture Initiative
dc.identifier.journalNature Plants
dc.rights.embargodate2020-05-11
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Breeding, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionNepal Agricultural Research Council, Kathmandu, Nepal
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Reproductive Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) Gatersleben, Gatersleben, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionNew Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Lincoln, New Zealand
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
kaust.personWang, Yajun
kaust.personBlilou, Ikram
kaust.personKrattinger, Simon G.
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-02T07:41:32Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Wang_Manuscript.pdf
Size:
1007.Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Accepted manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record