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dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Maren
dc.contributor.authorRoik, Anna Krystyna
dc.contributor.authorRöthig, Till
dc.contributor.authorWild, Christian
dc.contributor.authorRadecker, Nils
dc.contributor.authorBouwmeester, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-26T13:36:36Z
dc.date.available2019-11-26T13:36:36Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-07
dc.identifier.citationZiegler, M., Roik, A., Röthig, T., Wild, C., Rädecker, N., Bouwmeester, J., & Voolstra, C. R. (2019). Ecophysiology of Reef-Building Corals in the Red Sea. Coral Reefs of the World, 33–52. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-05802-9_3
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-05802-9_3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/660245
dc.description.abstractThe Red Sea is one of the warmest and most saline seas on the planet. Yet, scleractinian corals have managed to flourish under these distinct conditions supporting one of the largest networks of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the ecophysiology of reef-building corals gained from 60 years of research in the Red Sea starting from insights in the 1960s to the most recent studies of the past few years. We provide a brief overview over seasonal dynamics and environmental gradients in the Red Sea that are used to study ecophysiological processes of corals under changing environmental and extreme conditions (i.e., temperature, salinity, nutrient, and light availability). We then focus on how this environmental variability shapes the central processes of coral physiology in the Red Sea covering the topics of photosynthesis, calcification, nutrient cycling, and reproduction. We continue by reporting the first physiological measurements of Red Sea deep-sea corals. Last, we discuss how, through the integration of traditional methods with recent developments in the omics field and model systems, we are now beginning to understand the complexity of processes that contribute to the ecological success of corals under these variable conditions. This synthesis may serve as a basis for future studies that aim to contribute to a better understanding of the impacts of environmental change on coral reefs in the Red Sea and the rest of the world.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-030-05802-9_3
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Springer International Publishing
dc.titleEcophysiology of Reef-Building Corals in the Red Sea
dc.typeBook Chapter
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.rights.embargodate2020-05-08
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Microbiology, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionAquatic Research Facility, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Ecology Department, Faculty of Biology and Chemistry, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
dc.contributor.institutionSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Front Royal, VA, USA
kaust.personZiegler, Maren
kaust.personRoik, Anna Krystyna
kaust.personRöthig, Till
kaust.personRadecker, Nils
kaust.personBouwmeester, Jessica
kaust.personVoolstra, Christian R.


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