Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSubudhi, Amit
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Aidan John
dc.contributor.authorRamaprasad, Abhinay
dc.contributor.authorAbkallo, Hussein M.
dc.contributor.authorKaushik, Abhinav
dc.contributor.authorAnsari, Hifzur Rahman
dc.contributor.authorAbdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.
dc.contributor.authorRached, Fathia Ben
dc.contributor.authorKaneko, Osamu
dc.contributor.authorCulleton, Richard
dc.contributor.authorReece, Sarah E.
dc.contributor.authorPain, Arnab
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-07T09:59:46Z
dc.date.available2019-10-07T09:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-03
dc.identifier.citationSubudhi, A. K., O’Donnell, A. J., Ramaprasad, A., Abkallo, H. M., Kaushik, A., Ansari, H. R., … Pain, A. (2019). Disruption of the coordination between host circadian rhythms and malaria parasite development alters the duration of the intraerythrocytic cycle. doi:10.1101/791046
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/791046
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/656930
dc.description.abstractMalaria parasites complete their intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle (IDC) in multiples of 24 hours (depending on the species), suggesting a circadian basis to the asexual cell cycle, but the mechanism controlling this periodicity is unknown. Combining in vivo and in vitro approaches using rodent and human malaria parasites, we reveal that: (i) 57% of Plasmodium chabaudi genes exhibit 24 h circadian periodicity in transcription; (ii) 58% of these genes lose transcriptional rhythmicity when the IDC is out-of-synchrony with host rhythms; (iii) 9% of Plasmodium falciparum genes show circadian transcription under free-running conditions; (iv) Serpentine receptor 10 (SR10) has a circadian transcription profile and disrupting it in rodent malaria parasites shortens the IDC by 2-3 hours; (v) Multiple processes including DNA replication and the ubiquitin and proteasome pathways are affected by loss of coordination with host rhythms and by disruption of SR10. Our results show that malaria parasites are at least partly responsible for scheduling their IDCs explaining the fitness benefits of coordination with host rhythms.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe project was supported by a faculty baseline funding (BAS/1/1020-01-01) from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) to AP. RC is supported by Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Japan Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research Nos. 24255009, 25870525, 16K21233 and 19K07526. SER and AJOD are supported by Wellcome (202769/Z/16/Z; 204511/Z/16/Z), the Royal Society (UF110155; NF140517) and the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0046/2013). The authors thank the staff of the Bioscience Core Laboratory in KAUST for sequencing RNAseq libraries and all members of the Reece lab at the University of Edinburgh and pathogen genomics lab at KAUST for assistance during the experiments. This work was partly conducted at the Joint Usage / Research Center for Tropical Disease, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Japan.
dc.publisherCold Spring Harbor Laboratory
dc.relation.urlhttp://biorxiv.org/lookup/doi/10.1101/791046
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleDisruption of the coordination between host circadian rhythms and malaria parasite development alters the duration of the intraerythrocytic cycle
dc.typePreprint
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC)
dc.contributor.departmentPathogen Genomics Group
dc.eprint.versionPre-print
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Evolutionary Biology, and Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FL, UK
dc.contributor.institutionMalaria Unit, Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Protozoology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Zoonosis Control, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE); Hokkaido University, N20 W10 Kita-ku, Sapporo, 001-0020 Japan
kaust.personSubudhi, Amit
kaust.personRamaprasad, Abhinay
kaust.personKaushik, Abhinav
kaust.personAnsari, Hifzur Rahman
kaust.personAbdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.
kaust.personRached, Fathia Ben
kaust.personPain, Arnab
kaust.grant.numberBAS/1/1020-01-01
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-07T10:00:38Z
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitBioscience Core Laboratory
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitpathogen genomics lab at KAUST


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Preprint file 1.pdf
Size:
4.818Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Pre-print

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.