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dc.contributor.authorBarbato, Marta
dc.contributor.authorMapelli, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorCrotti, Elena
dc.contributor.authorDaffonchio, Daniele
dc.contributor.authorBorin, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T13:26:27Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T13:26:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-09
dc.identifier.citationBarbato M, Mapelli F, Crotti E, Daffonchio D, Borin S (2019) Cultivable hydrocarbon degrading bacteria have low phylogenetic diversity but highly versatile functional potential. International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation 142: 43–51. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2019.04.012.
dc.identifier.issn0964-8305
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ibiod.2019.04.012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/653093
dc.description.abstractHydrocarbon (HC)pollution is a threat to the marine environment and bioremediation strategies based on microbial degradation have been developed for pollution clean-up. Effectiveness of bioaugmentation, i.e. the addition of suitable HC-degrading microorganisms to the polluted matrix, strongly depends on the metabolic and physiological versatility of cultivable HC-degrading microorganisms and on their adaptation capacity. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of laboratory enrichment approaches to obtain cultivable HC-degrading bacteria having versatility breadth. Despite we used as inoculum marine samples of different origin and contamination history, and applied different enrichment strategies, we brought into culture 183 hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial strains strongly dominated by only the two genera Alcanivorax and Marinobacter. These isolates, screened for traits related to HC degradation, biostimulation and abiotic stress tolerance, demonstrated nevertheless to have a diverse functional potential, correlated to the adopted enrichment strategy. Although the obtained strains resulted phylogenetically similar, we showed that multiple cultivation approaches enhanced their metabolic diversification with potential benefits for bioaugmentation effectiveness.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was granted by the EU FP7 project Kill Spill (G.A. No. 312139)and the EU Horizon 2020 Project INMARE (G.A. No. 634486). DD thanks the support of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (baseline research funds to DD). The authors acknowledge Dr. Simone Cappello and Dr. Mirko Magagnini and their research groups for providing part of the environmental samples used in this work, and Ms. Valentina Sforza for her contribute in performing the physiological characterization of the strains.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964830519300617
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, [142, , (2019-05-09)] DOI: 10.1016/j.ibiod.2019.04.012 . © 2019. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectAlcanivorax
dc.subjectBacterial diversity
dc.subjectBioaugmentation
dc.subjectCultivation strategies
dc.subjectMarine bioremediation
dc.subjectMarinobacter
dc.titleCultivable hydrocarbon degrading bacteria have low phylogenetic diversity but highly versatile functional potential
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.identifier.journalInternational Biodeterioration & Biodegradation
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, 20133, Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy, , Italy
kaust.personDaffonchio, Daniele


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