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dc.contributor.authorSchubert, N.
dc.contributor.authorSalazar, V.W.
dc.contributor.authorRich, W.A.
dc.contributor.authorBercovich, M. Vivanco
dc.contributor.authorSaá, A.C. Almeida
dc.contributor.authorFadigas, S.D.
dc.contributor.authorSilva, J.
dc.contributor.authorHorta, P.A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-29T07:53:14Z
dc.date.available2019-04-29T07:53:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-23
dc.identifier.citationSchubert N, Salazar VW, Rich WA, Bercovich MV, Saá ACA, et al. (2019) Rhodolith primary and carbonate production in a changing ocean: The interplay of warming and nutrients. Science of The Total Environment. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.280.
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.280
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/632548
dc.description.abstractRhodolith beds, like many other marine ecosystems, are affected by climate change that is causing an increase in the magnitude and frequency of extreme high temperature events (heat waves). Unfortunately, this does not represent the sole peril for these communities, as coastal urbanization in conjunction with altered precipitation patterns can increase terrestrial-derived nutrient input. In Brazil, rhodolith beds are among the most extensive coastal benthic ecosystems, but despite their vast distribution and great ecological and economic importance, studies on the productivity of these communities and the impact of changing environmental conditions are almost non-existent. This study addressed the individual and combined effects of increases in temperature and nutrient concentration on the physiological performance of two widely distributed rhodolith species, Lithothamnion crispatum and Melyvonnea erubescens. The results showed species-specific responses in net photosynthetic performance, with no response in L. crispatum, while M. erubescens responded negatively to both increase in temperature and nutrients. In contrast, calcification in both species showed a significant decline at high temperature. No interactive effects were found between temperature and nutrients, yet their combined negative effects were additive, resulting in negative daily-integrated net productivity and a large decline in daily carbonate production in both species. This has strong implications for rhodolith bed primary productivity and carbonate production, as heat waves may potentially cause a strong decline in carbonate production (ca. 50% loss), accompanied by a severe drop in primary productivity that will be even more pronounced under high-nutrient conditions. Also, the species-specific responses to changes in temperature and nutrient concentration suggest that the magnitude of impact of these factors on rhodolith bed productivity will depend on the species dominating the community and may finally result in changes in rhodolith community composition.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants from FINEP/Rede CLIMA (Grant Number 01.13.0353-00) and CNPq-Universal (426215/2016-8) to PAH and scholarships granted to VWS (Iniciação à Pesquisa- BIP/UFSC 2016/2017, Programa Institucional de Bolsas de Iniciação CientíficaPIBIC/CNPq), to ACAS by PELD-ILOC (Grant Number 403740/2012-6) and to MVB by the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - Brasil (CAPES- Finance Code 001). This study also received Portuguese national funds from FCT- Foundation for Science and Technology through project UID/Multi/04326/2019, to JS. We also greatly appreciate the help of Dr. José Carlos Simonassi and Paulo Manso (Núcleo de Estudos do Mar/UFSC) with the nutrient analysis and the mesocosm system, respectively.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969719318157
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Science of The Total Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Science of The Total Environment, [, , (2019-04-23)] DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.280 . © 2019. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectCalcification
dc.subjectCoralline algae
dc.subjectNutrients
dc.subjectPhotosynthesis
dc.subjectRhodolith bed
dc.subjectTemperature
dc.titleRhodolith primary and carbonate production in a changing ocean: The interplay of warming and nutrients
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalScience of The Total Environment
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratório de Ficologia, Departamento de Botânica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionPrograma de Pós-graduação em Oceanografia, Centro de Ciências Físicas e Matemáticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, Florianopolis, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionCOPPE/SAGE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionCurso de Graduação em Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionPrograma de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil
dc.contributor.institutionCCMAR - Centre of Marine Sciences, University of Algarve, Campus Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
kaust.personRich, W.A.
dc.date.published-online2019-04-23
dc.date.published-print2019-08


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