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dc.contributor.authorSavva, Achilleas
dc.contributor.authorCendra, Camila
dc.contributor.authorGiugni, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorTorre, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorSurgailis, Jokubas
dc.contributor.authorohayon, David
dc.contributor.authorGiovannitti , Alexander
dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, Iain
dc.contributor.authorDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorRivnay, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorInal, Sahika
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-27T06:09:30Z
dc.date.available2019-03-27T06:09:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-04
dc.identifier.citationSavva A, Cendra C, Giugni A, Torre B, Surgailis J, et al. (2019) Influence of Water on the Performance of Organic Electrochemical Transistors. Chemistry of Materials 31: 927–937. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04335.
dc.identifier.issn0897-4756
dc.identifier.issn1520-5002
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04335
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/631728
dc.description.abstractOrganic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) composed of organic mixed conductors can operate in aqueous, biological media and translate low-magnitude ionic fluctuations of biological origin into measurable electrical signals. The growing technological interest in these biotransducers makes the fundamental understanding of ion-to-electron coupling extremely important for the design of new materials and devices. One crucial aspect in this process that has been so far disregarded is the water taken up by the film during device operation and its effects on device performance. Here, using a series of the same electrolyte with varying ion concentrations, we quantify the amount of water that is incorporated into a hydrophilic p-type organic semiconductor film alongside the dopant anions and investigate structural and morphological changes occurring in the film upon electrochemical doping. We show that infiltration of the hydrated dopant ions into the film irreversibly changes the polymer structure and negatively impacts the efficiency, reversibility, and speed of charge generation. When less water is injected into the channel, OECTs exhibit higher transconductance and faster switching speeds. Although swelling is commonly suggested to be a necessity for efficient ion-to-electron transduction, this work uncovers the negative impact of a swollen channel material on the performance of accumulation mode OECTs and lays the foundation for future materials design.
dc.description.sponsorshipJ.R. acknowledges support from the National Science Foundation (Grant NSF DMR-1751308). A.S. and C.C. acknowledge support from the NSF (Grant NSF DMR-1808401). Portions of this research were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04335
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Chemistry of Materials, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b04335.
dc.titleInfluence of Water on the Performance of Organic Electrochemical Transistors
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Solar Center (KSC)
dc.contributor.departmentMaterial Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalChemistry of Materials
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, United States
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Imperial College London, London SW72AZ, U.K.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States
kaust.personSavva, Achilleas
kaust.personGiugni, Andrea
kaust.personTorre, Bruno
kaust.personSurgailis, Jokubas
kaust.personOhayon, David
kaust.personMcCulloch, Iain
kaust.personDi Fabrizio, Enzo M.
kaust.personInal, Sahika
dc.date.published-online2019-01-04
dc.date.published-print2019-02-12


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