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dc.contributor.authorCendra, Camila
dc.contributor.authorGiovannitti , Alexander
dc.contributor.authorSavva, Achilleas
dc.contributor.authorVenkatraman, Vishak
dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, Iain
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorInal, Sahika
dc.contributor.authorRivnay, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-27T09:42:04Z
dc.date.available2019-02-27T09:42:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-19
dc.identifier.citationCendra C, Giovannitti A, Savva A, Venkatraman V, McCulloch I, et al. (2018) Role of the Anion on the Transport and Structure of Organic Mixed Conductors. Advanced Functional Materials 29: 1807034. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201807034.
dc.identifier.issn1616-301X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adfm.201807034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/631224
dc.description.abstractOrganic mixed conductors are increasingly employed in electrochemical devices operating in aqueous solutions that leverage simultaneous transport of ions and electrons. Indeed, their mode of operation relies on changing their doping (oxidation) state by the migration of ions to compensate for electronic charges. Nevertheless, the structural and morphological changes that organic mixed conductors experience when ions and water penetrate the material are not fully understood. Through a combination of electrochemical, gravimetric, and structural characterization, the effects of water and anions with a hydrophilic conjugated polymer are elucidated. Using a series of sodium-ion aqueous salts of varying anion size, hydration shells, and acidity, the links between the nature of the anion and the transport and structural properties of the polymer are systematically studied. Upon doping, ions intercalate in the crystallites, permanently modifying the lattice spacings, and residual water swells the film. The polymer, however, maintains electrochemical reversibility. The performance of electrochemical transistors reveals that doping with larger, less hydrated, anions increases their transconductance but decreases switching speed. This study highlights the complexity of electrolyte-mixed conductor interactions and advances materials design, emphasizing the coupled role of polymer and electrolyte (solvent and ion) in device performance.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation including Grant No. NSF DMR-1751308 (J.R.), Grant No. NSF DMR-1507826 (A.S.), and Grant No. NSF DMR-1808401 (C.C.). C.C. also gratefully acknowledges support from the “la Caixa” Foundation. Portions of this research were carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. A.G. and I.M. acknowledge funding from Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Project EP/G037515/1 and EP/N509486/1. This work utilized the Northwestern University Micro/Nano Fabrication Facility (NUFAB), which is partially supported by the Soft and Hybrid Nanotechnology Experimental (SHyNE) Resource (Grant No. NSF ECCS-1542205), the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (Grant No. NSF DMR-1720139), the State of Illinois, and Northwestern University.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adfm.201807034
dc.subjectbioelectronics
dc.subjectdoping
dc.subjectorganic mixed conductors
dc.subjectstructure–property relationships
dc.titleRole of the Anion on the Transport and Structure of Organic Mixed Conductors
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Solar Center (KSC)
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Functional Materials
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering; Stanford University; CA 94305 USA.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biomedical Engineering; Northwestern University; IL 60208 USA.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics; Imperial College London; SW7 2AZ London UK.
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry; Imperial College London; SW7 2AZ London UK.
dc.contributor.institutionSimpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology; Northwestern University; IL 60611 USA.
kaust.personSavva, Achilleas
kaust.personMcCulloch, Iain
kaust.personInal, Sahika
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-01T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2018-12-19
dc.date.published-print2019-02


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