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dc.contributor.authorSerano, Natalia Lorena Gorron
dc.contributor.authorLing, Yu
dc.contributor.authorBahieldin, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorMahfouz, Magdy M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T08:19:09Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T08:19:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-17
dc.identifier.citationSerrano N, Ling Y, Bahieldin A, Mahfouz MM (2019) Thermopriming reprograms metabolic homeostasis to confer heat tolerance. Scientific Reports 9. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-36484-z.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-36484-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/631038
dc.description.abstractHeat stress threatens agriculture worldwide. Plants acquire heat stress tolerance through priming, which establishes stress memory during mild or severe transient heat stress. Such induced thermotolerance restructures metabolic networks and helps maintain metabolic homeostasis under heat stress. Here, we used an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry-based platform to explore the composition and dynamics of the metabolome of Arabidopsis thaliana under heat stress and identify metabolites involved in thermopriming. Primed plants performed better than non-primed plants under severe heat stress due to altered energy pathways and increased production of branched-chain amino acids, raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), lipolysis products, and tocopherols. These metabolites serve as osmolytes, antioxidants and growth precursors to help plants recover from heat stress, while lipid metabolites help protect membranes against heat stress. The carbohydrate (e.g., sucrose and RFOs) and lipid superpathway metabolites showed the most significant increases. Under heat stress, there appears to be crosstalk between carbohydrate metabolism (i.e., the thermomemory metabolites stachyose, galactinol, and raffinose) and tyrosine metabolism towards the production of the thermomemory metabolite salidroside, a phenylethanoid glycoside. Crosstalk occurs between two glycerophospholipid pathways (the biosynthetic pathways of the thermomemory metabolite S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and the terpenoid backbone) and the δ-tocopherol (chloroplast lipid) pathway, which favors the production of glycine betaine and other essential tocopherols, respectively, compounds which are essential for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Therefore, metabolomic analysis can provide comprehensive insights into the metabolites involved in stress responses, which could facilitate plant breeding to maximize crop yields under adverse conditions.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank members of the laboratory for genome engineering and synthetic biology at KAUST for their helpful discussions.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-36484-z
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThermopriming reprograms metabolic homeostasis to confer heat tolerance
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.contributor.departmentDesert Agriculture Initiative
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory for Genome Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Science
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reports
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80141, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia.
kaust.personSerano, Natalia Lorena Gorron
kaust.personLing, Yu
kaust.personMahfouz, Magdy M.
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-17T07:03:41Z
dc.date.published-online2019-01-17
dc.date.published-print2019-12


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.