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dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.
dc.contributor.authorZikmund, Emily
dc.contributor.authorYang, Wulin
dc.contributor.authorRossi, Ruggero
dc.contributor.authorKim, Kyoung-Yeol
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascal
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fang
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-08T05:35:03Z
dc.date.available2019-01-08T05:35:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-02
dc.identifier.citationLogan BE, Zikmund E, Yang W, Rossi R, Kim K-Y, et al. (2018) Impact of Ohmic Resistance on Measured Electrode Potentials and Maximum Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells. Environmental Science & Technology 52: 8977–8985. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.8b02055.
dc.identifier.issn0013-936X
dc.identifier.issn1520-5851
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.est.8b02055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/630751
dc.description.abstractLow solution conductivity is known to adversely impact power generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but its impact on measured electrode potentials has often been neglected in the reporting of electrode potentials. While errors in the working electrode (typically the anode) are usually small, larger errors can result in reported counter electrode potentials (typically the cathode) due to large distances between the reference and working electrodes or the use of whole cell voltages to calculate counter electrode potentials. As shown here, inaccurate electrode potentials impact conclusions concerning factors limiting power production in MFCs at higher current densities. To demonstrate how the electrochemical measurements should be adjusted using the solution conductivity, electrode potentials were estimated in MFCs with brush anodes placed close to the cathode (1 cm) or with flat felt anodes placed further from the cathode (3 cm) to avoid oxygen crossover to the anodes. The errors in the cathode potential for MFCs with brush anodes reached 94 mV using acetate in a 50 mM phosphate buffer solution. With a felt anode and acetate, cathode potential errors increased to 394 mV. While brush anode MFCs produced much higher power densities than flat anode MFCs under these conditions, this better performance was shown primarily to result from electrode spacing following correction of electrode potentials. Brush anode potentials corrected for solution conductivity were the same for brushes set 1 or 3 cm from the cathode, although the range of current produced was different due to ohmic losses with the larger distance. These results demonstrate the critical importance of using corrected electrode potentials to understand factors limiting power production in MFCs.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was supported by funds provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the Department of Energy (DOE) CPS Project #21263, and the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program via cooperative research agreement W9132T-16-2-0014 through the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center.
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Environmental Science & Technology, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see .
dc.titleImpact of Ohmic Resistance on Measured Electrode Potentials and Maximum Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technology
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 231Q Sackett Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, United States
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Environment and State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
kaust.personSaikaly, Pascal
dc.date.published-online2018-07-02
dc.date.published-print2018-08-07


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