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dc.contributor.authorSerrano, Oscar
dc.contributor.authorAlmahasheer, Hanan
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.
dc.contributor.authorIrigoien, Xabier
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-11T06:09:05Z
dc.date.available2018-10-11T06:09:05Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-09
dc.identifier.citationSerrano O, Almahasheer H, Duarte CM, Irigoien X (2018) Carbon stocks and accumulation rates in Red Sea seagrass meadows. Scientific Reports 8. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33182-8.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-33182-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/628921
dc.description.abstractSeagrasses play an important role in climate change mitigation and adaptation, acting as natural CO2 sinks and buffering the impacts of rising sea level. However, global estimates of organic carbon (Corg) stocks, accumulation rates and seafloor elevation rates in seagrasses are limited to a few regions, thus potentially biasing global estimates. Here we assessed the extent of soil Corg stocks and accumulation rates in seagrass meadows (Thalassia hemprichii, Enhalus acoroides, Halophila stipulacea, Thalassodendrum ciliatum and Halodule uninervis) from Saudi Arabia. We estimated that seagrasses store 3.4 ± 0.3 kg Corg m−2 in 1 m-thick soil deposits, accumulated at 6.8 ± 1.7 g Corg m−2 yr−1 over the last 500 to 2,000 years. The extreme conditions in the Red Sea, such as nutrient limitation reducing seagrass growth rates and high temperature increasing soil respiration rates, may explain their relative low Corg storage compared to temperate meadows. Differences in soil Corg storage among habitats (i.e. location and species composition) are mainly related to the contribution of seagrass detritus to the soil Corg pool, fluxes of Corg from adjacent mangrove and tidal marsh ecosystems into seagrass meadows, and the amount of fine sediment particles. Seagrasses sequester annually around 0.8% of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuels by Saudi Arabia, while buffering the impacts of sea level rise. This study contributes data from understudied regions to a growing dataset on seagrass carbon stocks and sequestration rates and further evidences that even small seagrass species store Corg in coastal areas.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this paper was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through the baseline funding to C.M. Duarte and X. Irigoien. O.S. was supported by an ARC DECRA (DE170101524) and Edith Cowan University Collaboration Enhancement Scheme. The authors are grateful to CMOR staff for their help in field and to C. Kavazos and Q. Ollivier for their help with the isotope mixing models.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-33182-8
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleCarbon stocks and accumulation rates in Red Sea seagrass meadows
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reports
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Science, Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, 6027, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, College of Science, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), Dammam, 31441-1982, Saudi Arabia
dc.contributor.institutionIKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain
dc.contributor.institutionAZTI - Marine Research, Herrera Kaia, Portualdea z/g –, 20110, Pasaia, (Gipuzkoa), Spain
kaust.personDuarte, Carlos M.
refterms.dateFOA2018-10-11T07:07:26Z
dc.date.published-online2018-10-09
dc.date.published-print2018-12


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This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.