Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSarathy, Mani
dc.contributor.authorAlfazazi, Adamu
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-19T10:35:26Z
dc.date.available2018-09-19T10:35:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.identifier.citationAlfazazi, A. (2018). Autoignition chemistry of liquid and gaseous fuels in non-premixed systems. KAUST Research Repository. https://doi.org/10.25781/KAUST-IIH87
dc.identifier.doi10.25781/KAUST-IIH87
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/628739
dc.description.abstractHeat-release in CI engines occurs in the presence of concentration and temperature gradients. Recognizing the need for a validation of chemical kinetic models in transport-affected systems, this study employs non-premixed systems to better understand complex couplings between low/high temperature oxidation kinetics and diffusive transport. This dissertation is divided into two sections. In the first section, a two-stage Lagrangian model compares model prediction of ignition delay time and experimental data from the KAUST ignition quality tester, and ignition data for liquid sprays in constant volume combustion chambers. The TSL employed in this study utilizes detailed chemical kinetics while also simulating basic mixing processes. The TSL model was found to be efficient in simulating IQT in long ignition delay time fuels; it was also effective in CVCC experiments with high injection pressures, where physical processes contributed little to ignition delay time. In section two, an atmospheric pressure counterflow burner was developed and fully validated. The counterflow burner was employed to examine the effects of molecular structure on low/high temperature reactivity of various fuels in transport-affected systems. These effects were investigated through measurement of conditions of extinction and ignition of various fuel/oxidizer mixtures. Data generated were used to validate various chemical kinetic models in diffusion flames. Where necessary, suggestions were made for improving these models. For hot flames studies, tested fuels included C3-C4 alcohols and six FACE gasoline fuels. Results for alcohols indicated that the substituted alcohols were less reactive than the normal alcohols. The ignition temperature of FACE gasoline was found to be nearly identical, while there was a slight difference in their extinction limits. Predictions by Sarathy et al. (2014) alcohol combustion model, and by the gasoline surrogate model (Sarathy et al., 2015), agreed with the experimental data. For cool diffusion flames studies, tested fuels included butane isomers, naphtha, gasolines and their surrogates. Results revealed that the addition of ozone successfully established cool flames in the fuels at low and moderate strain rates. Numerical simulations were performed to replicate the extinction limits of the cool flames of butane isomers. The model captured experimental trends for both fuels; but over-predicted their extinction limits.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectNon-Premixed
dc.subjectCombustion
dc.subjectCool Diffusion Flame
dc.subjectHot Diffusion Flame
dc.subjectTSL
dc.subjectTwo-Stage Lagrangian Model
dc.titleAutoignition chemistry of liquid and gaseous fuels in non-premixed systems
dc.typeDissertation
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
thesis.degree.grantorKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology
dc.contributor.committeememberPeinemann, Klaus-Viktor
dc.contributor.committeememberRoberts, William L.
dc.contributor.committeememberKuti, Olawole A.
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Biological Engineering
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-19T10:35:27Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Adamu Alfazazi - Thesis_Adamu5.pdf
Size:
3.919Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Adamu Alfazazi - Final Paper

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record