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dc.contributor.authorVu, Binh Thanh
dc.contributor.authorShahin, Sophia Allaf
dc.contributor.authorCroissant, Jonas G.
dc.contributor.authorFatieiev, Yevhen
dc.contributor.authorMatsumoto, Kotaro
dc.contributor.authorLe-Hoang Doan, Tan
dc.contributor.authorYik, Tammy
dc.contributor.authorSimargi, Shirleen
dc.contributor.authorConteras, Altagracia
dc.contributor.authorRatliff, Laura
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, Chiara Mauriello
dc.contributor.authorRaehm, Laurence
dc.contributor.authorKhashab, Niveen M.
dc.contributor.authorDurand, Jean-Olivier
dc.contributor.authorGlackin, Carlotta
dc.contributor.authorTamanoi, Fuyuhiko
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-04T10:09:19Z
dc.date.available2018-06-04T10:09:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-29
dc.identifier.citationVu BT, Shahin SA, Croissant J, Fatieiev Y, Matsumoto K, et al. (2018) Chick chorioallantoic membrane assay as an in vivo model to study the effect of nanoparticle-based anticancer drugs in ovarian cancer. Scientific Reports 8. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25573-8.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-25573-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/628022
dc.description.abstractNew therapy development is critically needed for ovarian cancer. We used the chicken egg CAM assay to evaluate efficacy of anticancer drug delivery using recently developed biodegradable PMO (periodic mesoporous organosilica) nanoparticles. Human ovarian cancer cells were transplanted onto the CAM membrane of fertilized eggs, resulting in rapid tumor formation. The tumor closely resembles cancer patient tumor and contains extracellular matrix as well as stromal cells and extensive vasculature. PMO nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin were injected intravenously into the chicken egg resulting in elimination of the tumor. No significant damage to various organs in the chicken embryo occurred. In contrast, injection of free doxorubicin caused widespread organ damage, even when less amount was administered. The lack of toxic effect of nanoparticle loaded doxorubicin was associated with specific delivery of doxorubicin to the tumor. Furthermore, we observed excellent tumor accumulation of the nanoparticles. Lastly, a tumor could be established in the egg using tumor samples from ovarian cancer patients and that our nanoparticles were effective in eliminating the tumor. These results point to the remarkable efficacy of our nanoparticle based drug delivery system and suggests the value of the chicken egg tumor model for testing novel therapies for ovarian cancer.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15K21764 (to FT) and City of Hope Women’s Cancer Award P30-CA33572 (to CAG). Support by ANR nanoptPDT (to JOD) is gratefully acknowledged. We would like to thank Dr. Yoshihito Uto (Tokushima University) for introducing us to the chicken egg tumor model. We would also like to thank Dr. Sharon Wilczynski, MD, PhD and the Pathology Core at City of Hope for their expertise opinion in verifying the high correlation of our tumor patient samples with tumors produced in the CAM model. Binh Vu was a visiting graduate researcher from Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh city and was supported by the Center for Global Mentoring (CGM) program.
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25573-8
dc.rights.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-25573-8
dc.subjectCancer
dc.subjectTargeted therapies
dc.titleChick chorioallantoic membrane assay as an in vivo model to study the effect of nanoparticle-based anticancer drugs in ovarian cancer
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentAdvanced Membranes and Porous Materials Research Center
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentChemical Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentSmart Hybrid Materials (SHMs) lab
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reports
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Stem Cell Research and Application, Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, City of Hope-Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA, USA
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Micro-Engineered Materials, Advanced Materials Laboratory, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Innovative Materials and Architectures, Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR-5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Montpellier, France
kaust.personCroissant, Jonas G.
kaust.personFatieiev, Yevhen
kaust.personKhashab, Niveen M.
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T08:27:37Z


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