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dc.contributor.authorShi, Le
dc.contributor.authorShi, Yusuf
dc.contributor.authorLi, Renyuan
dc.contributor.authorChang, Jian
dc.contributor.authorZaouri, Noor A.
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Elaf
dc.contributor.authorJin, Yong
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chenlin
dc.contributor.authorZhuo, Sifei
dc.contributor.authorWang, Peng
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-29T11:09:57Z
dc.date.available2018-05-29T11:09:57Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-25
dc.identifier.citationShi L, Shi Y, Li R, Chang J, Zaouri N, et al. (2018) SiC-C Composite as A Highly Stable and Easily Regenerable Photothermal Material for Practical Water Evaporation. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04695.
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485
dc.identifier.issn2168-0485
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04695
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627983
dc.description.abstractSolar-driven water distillation by photothermal materials is emerging as a promising way of renewable energy-driven clean water production. In designing photothermal materials, light absorption, photo-to-thermal conversion efficiency, and ability to localize thermal energy at the water-air interface are three important considerations. However, one additional consideration, regenerability, has so far slipped out of the photothermal material designs at status quo. This work reveals that there is a fouling layer formed during photothermal evaporation of real seawater (Red Sea water) and domestic wastewater, which once formed, would be difficult to remove. Herein, we synthesize a SiC-C composite monolith as an effective photothermal material where carbon acts as photothermal component and SiC serves as a heat conductor and strong structural support. The high mechanical strength of the monolithic composite makes it able to withstand repeatedly high strength physical cleaning by brush scrubbing and sonication and the anti-carbon-loss mechanism generates zero carbon loss during the physical cleaning. In the case of the domestic wastewater evaporation, the bio- and organic foulants on the SiC-C composite monolith can be totally removed by annealing at 1000 oC in N2 atmosphere. We believe that the SiC-C composite monoliths are promising photothermal materials in practical solar-driven water evaporation applications thanks to their highly stable and easily regenerable properties and therefore more research efforts are warranted to further improve their performances.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project is based upon work supported by the King Abdullah University Science and Technology (KAUST) CCF fund awarded to Water Desalination and Reuse Center (WDRC). Le Shi would like to thank Ran Tao from Mechanical Engineering at KAUST for his suggestions and comments of mechanical properties characterization.
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04695
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04695.
dc.titleSiC-C Composite as A Highly Stable and Easily Regenerable Photothermal Material for Practical Water Evaporation
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
kaust.personShi, Le
kaust.personShi, Yusuf
kaust.personLi, Renyuan
kaust.personChang, Jian
kaust.personZaouri, Noor A
kaust.personAhmed, Elaf
kaust.personJin, Yong
kaust.personZhang, Chenlin
kaust.personZhuo, Sifei
kaust.personWang, Peng
dc.date.published-online2018-05-25
dc.date.published-print2018-07-02


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