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dc.contributor.authorScarascia, Giantommaso
dc.contributor.authorYap, Scott
dc.contributor.authorKaksonen, Anna H.
dc.contributor.authorHong, Pei-Ying
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-07T07:36:24Z
dc.date.available2018-05-07T07:36:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-02
dc.identifier.citationScarascia G, Yap SA, Kaksonen AH, Hong P-Y (2018) Bacteriophage Infectivity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saline Conditions. Frontiers in Microbiology 9. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00875.
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.pmid29770130
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2018.00875
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627760
dc.description.abstractPseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous member of marine biofilm, and reduces thiosulfate to produce toxic hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, lytic bacteriophages were isolated and applied to inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa in planktonic mode at different temperature, pH, and salinity. Bacteriophages showed optimal infectivity at a multiplicity of infection of 10 in saline conditions, and demonstrated lytic abilities over all tested temperature (25, 30, 37, and 45°C) and pH 6–9. Planktonic P. aeruginosa exhibited significantly longer lag phase and lower specific growth rates upon exposure to bacteriophages. Bacteriophages were subsequently applied to P. aeruginosa-enriched biofilm and were determined to lower the relative abundance of Pseudomonas-related taxa from 0.17 to 5.58% in controls to 0.01–0.61% in treated microbial communities. The relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, and Planococcaceae decreased, possibly due to the phage-induced disruption of the biofilm matrix. Lastly, when applied to mitigate biofouling of ultrafiltration membranes, bacteriophages were determined to reduce the transmembrane pressure increase by 18% when utilized alone, and by 49% when used in combination with citric acid. The combined treatment was more effective compared with the citric acid treatment alone, which reported ca. 30% transmembrane pressure reduction. Collectively, the findings demonstrated that bacteriophages can be used as a biocidal agent to mitigate undesirable P. aeruginosa-associated problems in seawater applications.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this publication was supported by CRG funding URF/1/2982-01-01 from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) awarded to P-YH. AK thanks KAUST and CSIRO Land and Water for financial support.
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SA
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00875/
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectbacteriophage
dc.subjectgreen biocides
dc.subjectbiofilm removal
dc.subjectplanktonic cells
dc.subjectultrafiltration membrane
dc.titleBacteriophage Infectivity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saline Conditions
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Microbiology
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
dc.contributor.institutionLand and Water, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Canberra, ACT, Australia
kaust.personScarascia, Giantommaso
kaust.personYap, Scott
kaust.personHong, Pei-Ying
kaust.grant.numberURF/1/2982-01-01
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T12:03:18Z


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.