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dc.contributor.authorKharbush, Jenan J
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Luke R
dc.contributor.authorHaroon, Mohamed
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Rob
dc.contributor.authorAluwihare, Lihini I
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-19T10:45:31Z
dc.date.available2018-04-19T10:45:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-12
dc.identifier.citationKharbush JJ, Thompson LR, Haroon MF, Knight R, Aluwihare LI (2018) Hopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers. FEMS Microbiology Ecology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiy063.
dc.identifier.issn1574-6941
dc.identifier.pmid29668882
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/femsec/fiy063
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/627565
dc.description.abstractHopanoids, including the extended side chain-containing bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), are bacterial lipids found abundantly in the geological record and across Earth's surface environments. However, the physiological roles of this biomarker remain uncertain, limiting interpretation of their presence in current and past environments. Recent work investigating the diversity and distribution of hopanoid producers in the marine environment implicated low-oxygen regions as important loci of hopanoid production, and data from marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) suggested that the dominant hopanoid producers in these environments are nitrite-utilizing organisms, revealing a potential connection between hopanoid production and the marine nitrogen cycle. Here we use metagenomic data from the Red Sea to investigate the ecology of hopanoid producers in an environmental setting that is biogeochemically distinct from those investigated previously. The distributions of hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation genes in the Red Sea are closely correlated, and the majority of hopanoid producers are taxonomically affiliated with the major marine nitrite oxidizers, Nitrospinae and Nitrospirae. These results suggest that the relationship between hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation is conserved across varying biogeochemical conditions in dark ocean microbial ecosystems.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (awarded to JJK). In addition, the KAUST Red Sea Expedition 2011 was funded by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank the participants of the KAUST Red Sea Expedition 2011, including the P.I. Dr. Ulrich Stingl (currently at University of Florida) and those who helped to generate the data. We also thank Dr. Peter Girguis (Harvard University) for supporting MFH during the preparation of this manuscript.
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/femsec/advance-article/doi/10.1093/femsec/fiy063/4969676
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in FEMS Microbiology Ecology following peer review. The version of record is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/femsec/advance-article/doi/10.1093/femsec/fiy063/4969676.
dc.subjecthopanoids
dc.subjectmicrobial ecology
dc.subjectRed Sea
dc.subjectNitrospina
dc.subjectnitrite oxidizing bacteria
dc.subjectmetagenomics
dc.titleHopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.identifier.journalFEMS Microbiology Ecology
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
dc.contributor.institutionHarvard University, Earth and Plantary Sciences, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
dc.contributor.institutionThompson, Luke; University of California San Diego, Department of Pediatrics; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of California San Diego, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, Department of Computer Science and Engineering; University of California San Diego, Center for Microbiome, Innovation
kaust.personHaroon, Mohamed
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-12T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2018-04-12
dc.date.published-print2018-06-01


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