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dc.contributor.authorShah, Syed Haleem
dc.contributor.authorHouborg, Rasmus
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-15T06:10:41Z
dc.date.available2018-01-15T06:10:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-12
dc.identifier.citation(2017) Response of Chlorophyll, Carotenoid and SPAD-502 Measurement to Salinity and Nutrient Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Agronomy 7: 61. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/agronomy7030061.
dc.identifier.issn2073-4395
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/agronomy7030061
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/626767
dc.description.abstractAbiotic stress can alter key physiological constituents and functions in green plants. Improving the capacity to monitor this response in a non-destructive manner is of considerable interest, as it would offer a direct means of initiating timely corrective action. Given the vital role that plant pigments play in the photosynthetic process and general plant physiological condition, their accurate estimation would provide a means to monitor plant health and indirectly determine stress response. The aim of this work is to evaluate the response of leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid (C-t) content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to changes in varying application levels of soil salinity and fertilizer applied over a complete growth cycle. The study also seeks to establish and analyze relationships between measurements from a SPAD-502 instrument and the leaf pigments, as extracted at the anthesis stage. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted in triplicate by employing distinct treatments of both soil salinity and fertilizer dose at three levels. Results showed that higher doses of fertilizer increased the content of leaf pigments across all levels of soil salinity. Likewise, increasing the level of soil salinity significantly increased the chlorophyll and Ct content per leaf area at all levels of applied fertilizer. However, as an adaptation process and defense mechanism under salinity stress, leaves were found to be thicker and narrower. Thus, on a per-plant basis, increasing salinity significantly reduced the chlorophyll (Chl(t)) and Ct produced under each fertilizer treatment. In addition, interaction effects of soil salinity and fertilizer application on the photosynthetic pigment content were found to be significant, as the higher amounts of fertilizer augmented the detrimental effects of salinity. A strong positive (R-2 = 0.93) and statistically significant (p < 0.001) relationship between SPAD-502 values and Chlt and between SPAD-502 values and Ct content (R-2 = 0.85) was determined based on a large (n = 277) dataset. We demonstrate that the SPAD-502 readings and plant photosynthetic pigment content per-leaf area are profoundly affected by salinity and nutrient stress, but that the general form of their relationship remains largely unaffected by the stress. As such, a generalized regression model can be used for Chlt and Ct estimation, even across a range of salinity and fertilizer gradients.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to extend their sincere appreciation to staff of the greenhouse, along with Prof Mark Tester and his Salt Laboratory (https://saltlab.kaust.edu.sa) for their support and access to facilities during the experimental period. Research reported in this publication was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/2073-4395/7/3/61
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectwheat crop
dc.subjectSPAD measurement
dc.subjectchlorophyll
dc.subjectcarotenoids
dc.subjectpigment
dc.subjectsalinity stress
dc.subjectnutrient stress
dc.subjectphotosynthesis
dc.titleResponse of Chlorophyll, Carotenoid and SPAD-502 Measurement to Salinity and Nutrient Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalAgronomy
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDF
kaust.personShah, Syed Haleem
kaust.personHouborg, Rasmus
kaust.personMcCabe, Matthew
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T21:01:37Z


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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).