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dc.contributor.authorYi, Ying
dc.contributor.authorKosel, Jürgen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T06:58:01Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T06:58:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-08
dc.identifier.citationYi Y, Kosel J (2017) A remotely operated drug delivery system with dose control. Sensors and Actuators A: Physical 261: 177–183. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sna.2017.05.007.
dc.identifier.issn0924-4247
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sna.2017.05.007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623672
dc.description.abstract“On demand” implantable drug delivery systems can provide optimized treatments, due to their ability to provide targeted, flexible and precise dose release. However, two important issues that need to be carefully considered in a mature device include an effective actuation stimulus and a controllable dose release mechanism. This work focuses on remotely powering an implantable drug delivery system and providing a high degree of control over the released dose. This is accomplished by integration of a resonance-based wireless power transfer system, a constant voltage control circuit and an electrolytic pump. Upon the activation of the wireless power transfer system, the electrolytic actuator is remotely powered by a constant voltage regardless of movements of the device within an effective range of translation and rotation. This in turn contributes to a predictable dose release rate and greater flexibility in the positioning of external powering source. We have conducted proof-of-concept drug delivery studies using the liquid drug in reservoir approach and the solid drug in reservoir approach, respectively. Our experimental results demonstrate that the range of flow rate is mainly determined by the voltage controlled with a Zener diode and the resistance of the implantable device. The latter can be adjusted by connecting different resistors, providing control over the flow rate to meet different clinical needs. The flow rate can be maintained at a constant level within the effective movement range. When using a solid drug substitute with a low solubility, solvent blue 38, the dose release can be kept at 2.36μg/cycle within the effective movement range by using an input voltage of 10Vpp and a load of 1.5 kΩ, which indicates the feasibility and controllability of our system without any complicated closed-loop sensor.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424717308087
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Sensors and Actuators A: Physical. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 8 May 2017. DOI: 10.1016/j.sna.2017.05.007. © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleA remotely operated drug delivery system with dose control
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalSensors and Actuators A: Physical
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Engineering, University of British Columbia (UBC), Kelowna, Canada, postal code: V1V 1V7
kaust.personKosel, Jürgen


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