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dc.contributor.authorInal, Sahika
dc.contributor.authorHama, Adel
dc.contributor.authorFerro, Magali
dc.contributor.authorPitsalidis, Charalampos
dc.contributor.authorOziat, Julie
dc.contributor.authorIandolo, Donata
dc.contributor.authorPappa, Anna-Maria
dc.contributor.authorHadida, Mikhael
dc.contributor.authorHuerta, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorMarchat, David
dc.contributor.authorMailley, Pascal
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Róisín M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T12:53:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-17T12:53:53Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-03
dc.identifier.citationInal S, Hama A, Ferro M, Pitsalidis C, Oziat J, et al. (2017) Conducting Polymer Scaffolds for Hosting and Monitoring 3D Cell Culture. Advanced Biosystems: 1700052. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adbi.201700052.
dc.identifier.issn2366-7478
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adbi.201700052
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adbi.201770038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623658
dc.description.abstractThis work reports the design of a live-cell monitoring platform based on a macroporous scaffold of a conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate). The conducting polymer scaffolds support 3D cell cultures due to their biocompatibility and tissue-like elasticity, which can be manipulated by inclusion of biopolymers such as collagen. Integration of a media perfusion tube inside the scaffold enables homogenous cell spreading and fluid transport throughout the scaffold, ensuring long term cell viability. This also allows for co-culture of multiple cell types inside the scaffold. The inclusion of cells within the porous architecture affects the impedance of the electrically conducting polymer network and, thus, is utilized as an in situ tool to monitor cell growth. Therefore, while being an integral part of the 3D tissue, the conducting polymer is an active component, enhancing the tissue function, and forming the basis for a bioelectronic device with integrated sensing capability.
dc.description.sponsorshipS.I. and C.P. gratefully acknowledge financial support from the ANR 3Bs project. This work was also supported by the Marie Curie ITN project OrgBio No. 607896. S.I. and A.H. benefitted from fruitful discussions with Professor Gordon Wallace at the University of Wollongong thanks to visits funded by the Marie Curie MASK project No. 269302, and from Dr. Pierre Leleux (EMSE) and Dr. Ilke Uguz (EMSE) related to device fabrication.
dc.publisherWiley
dc.titleConducting Polymer Scaffolds for Hosting and Monitoring 3D Cell Culture
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentBioscience Program
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Biosystems
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Bioelectronics; Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines; CMP-EMSE; Gardanne 13541 France
dc.contributor.institutionCEA; LETI; MINATEC Campus; 38054 Grenoble France
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire Sainbiose; Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines; CIS-EMSE; St. Etienne 42023 France
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Infectomics and Molecular Pathogenesis; Cinvestav 14-740, 070000 Mexico
kaust.personInal, Sahika
dc.date.published-online2017-05-03
dc.date.published-print2017-06


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