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dc.contributor.authorWang, Hong
dc.contributor.authorJia, Jia
dc.contributor.authorSong, Pengfei
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qiang
dc.contributor.authorLi, Debao
dc.contributor.authorMin, Shixiong
dc.contributor.authorQian, Chenxi
dc.contributor.authorWang, Lu
dc.contributor.authorLi, Young Feng
dc.contributor.authorMa, Chun
dc.contributor.authorWu, Tao
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Jiayin
dc.contributor.authorAntonietti, Markus
dc.contributor.authorOzin, Geoffrey A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T07:41:39Z
dc.date.available2017-05-17T07:41:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-01
dc.identifier.citationWang H, Jia J, Song P, Wang Q, Li D, et al. (2017) Efficient Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Nitrogen-Doped Nanoporous Carbon/Carbon Nanotube Membranes - A Step Towards the Electrochemical CO2 Refinery. Angewandte Chemie International Edition. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201703720.
dc.identifier.issn1433-7851
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/anie.201703720
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ange.201703720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623632
dc.description.abstractThe search for earth abundant, efficient and stable electrocatalysts that can enable the chemical reduction of CO2 to value-added chemicals and fuels at an industrially relevant scale, is a high priority for the development of a global network of renewable energy conversion and storage systems that can meaningfully impact greenhouse gas induced climate change. Here we introduce a straightforward, low cost, scalable and technologically relevant method to manufacture an all-carbon, electroactive, nitrogen-doped nanoporous carbon-carbon nanotube composite membrane. The membrane is demonstrated to function as a binder-free, high-performance electrode for the electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to formate. The Faradaic efficiency for the production of formate is 81%. Furthermore, the robust structural and electrochemical properties of the membrane endow it with excellent long-term stability.
dc.description.sponsorshipG.A.O. is a Government of Canada Research Chair in Materials Chem istry and Nanochemistry. Financial support for this work was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Research Innovation (MRI); Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure (MEDI); Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change; Connaught Innovation Fund; Connaught Global Challenge Fund; and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). S. M. acknowledges the financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21463001). J. Y. is grateful for financial support from the Max Planck society, Germany, Clarkson University, USA and the ERC (European Research Council) Starting Grant (project number 639720-NAPOLI).
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.201703720/abstract;jsessionid=9AC18E02CA45212A56BBE52387F9B336.f03t01
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Efficient Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Nitrogen-Doped Nanoporous Carbon/Carbon Nanotube Membranes - A Step Towards the Electrochemical CO2 Refinery, which has been published in final form at http://doi.org/10.1002/anie.201703720. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
dc.subjectPoly(ionic Liquid) * Carbon Membrane * Nitrogen-doping * Hierarchical Architecture * Co2 Reduction
dc.titleEfficient Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Nitrogen-Doped Nanoporous Carbon/Carbon Nanotube Membranes - A Step Towards the Electrochemical CO2 Refinery
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Nano Oxides for Sustainable Energy
dc.contributor.departmentMaterial Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalAngewandte Chemie International Edition
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto; Department of Chemistry; M5S 3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.contributor.institutionUniverisity of Toronto; Department of chemistry; 80 St. George St. ON M5S 3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.contributor.institutionNorthwest normal univesity; College of chenistry and chemcial engineering; 730070 Lanzhou CHINA
dc.contributor.institutionState Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, the Chinese Academy of Sciences; 030001 Taiyuan CHINA
dc.contributor.institutionBeifang University of Nationalities; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Yinchuan CHINA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto; Department of chemistry; 80 St. George St. M5S 3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto; Department of Chemistry; 80 St. George St. M5S 3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto; Department of Chemistry; M5S3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.contributor.institutionClarkson University; Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Science; UNITED STATES
dc.contributor.institutionMax Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces; Department of colloidal chemistry; 14476 Potsdam 14476 Potsdam GERMANY
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto; Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories; 80 St. George Street M5S 3H6 Toronto CANADA
dc.identifier.arxividarXiv:1905.01466
kaust.personMa, Chun
kaust.personWu, Tao
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-12T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2017-06-01
dc.date.published-print2017-06-26


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