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dc.contributor.authorVan Nevel, S.
dc.contributor.authorKoetzsch, S.
dc.contributor.authorProctor, C.R.
dc.contributor.authorBesmer, M.D.
dc.contributor.authorPrest, E.I.
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.
dc.contributor.authorKnezev, A.
dc.contributor.authorBoon, N.
dc.contributor.authorHammes, F.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T12:55:02Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T12:55:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-08
dc.identifier.citationVan Nevel S, Koetzsch S, Proctor CR, Besmer MD, Prest EI, et al. (2017) Flow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring. Water Research. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.01.065.
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2017.01.065
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622853
dc.description.abstractDrinking water utilities and researchers continue to rely on the century-old heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) method for routine assessment of general microbiological water quality. Bacterial cell counting with flow cytometry (FCM) is one of a number of alternative methods that challenge this status quo and provide an opportunity for improved water quality monitoring. After more than a decade of application in drinking water research, FCM methodology is optimised and established for routine application, supported by a considerable amount of data from multiple full-scale studies. Bacterial cell concentrations obtained by FCM enable quantification of the entire bacterial community instead of the minute fraction of cultivable bacteria detected with HPC (typically < 1% of all bacteria). FCM measurements are reproducible with relative standard deviations below 3% and can be available within 15 min of samples arriving in the laboratory. High throughput sample processing and complete automation are feasible and FCM analysis is arguably less expensive than HPC when measuring more than 15 water samples per day, depending on the laboratory and selected staining procedure(s). Moreover, many studies have shown FCM total (TCC) and intact (ICC) cell concentrations to be reliable and robust process variables, responsive to changes in the bacterial abundance and relevant for characterising and monitoring drinking water treatment and distribution systems. The purpose of this critical review is to initiate a constructive discussion on whether FCM could replace HPC in routine water quality monitoring. We argue that FCM provides a faster, more descriptive and more representative quantification of bacterial abundance in drinking water.
dc.description.sponsorshipSam van Nevel was supported by the project grant no. G.0808.10N and the travel grant V424114N of the FWO Flanders and the Inter-University Attraction Pole (IUAP) ‘μ-manager’ funded by the Belgian Science Policy (BELSPO, 305 P7/25); Emmanuelle Prest and Hans Vrouwenvelder were supported by funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Evides Waterbedrijf; the Inter-University Attraction Pole (IUAP) ‘μ-manager’ funded by the Belgian Science Policy (BELSPO, 305 P7/25); Caitlin Proctor was supported by MERMAID, a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Initial Training Network, under grant number 607492. We thank Alina Nescerecka, the Kantonal Laboratory Zürich, Industrielle Werke Basel – Wasserlabor (IWB) and Pidpa for the shared data, Lisa Neu for literature support and Synthia Maes for the critical reading of the manuscript.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135417300726
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Water Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Water Research, [, , (2017-02-08)] DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.01.065 . © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectCultivation
dc.subjectMicrobiological drinking water quality
dc.subjectFlow cytometry (FCM)
dc.subjectHeterotrophic plate counts (HPC)
dc.subjectRoutine water monitoring
dc.titleFlow cytometric bacterial cell counts challenge conventional heterotrophic plate counts for routine microbiological drinking water monitoring
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalWater Research
dc.eprint.versionPost-print
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Microbial Ecology and Technology (CMET), Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000, Gent, Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionEawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, CH-8600, Dübendorf, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental Systems Science, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Van der Maasweg 9, 2629 HZ, Delft, The Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Oostergoweg 9, 8911 MA, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionHet Waterlaboratorium, J.W. Lucasweg 2, 2031 BE, Haarlem, The Netherlands
kaust.personVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-08T00:00:00Z
dc.date.published-online2017-02-08
dc.date.published-print2017-04


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