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dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Myrrha E.
dc.contributor.authorModak, Nabanita
dc.contributor.authorWinterrowd, Christopher K.
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chun Wai
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, William L.
dc.contributor.authorWendt, Jost O L
dc.contributor.authorLinak, William P.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T09:08:26Z
dc.date.available2017-01-02T09:08:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-19
dc.identifier.citationAndersen ME, Modak N, Winterrowd CK, Lee CW, Roberts WL, et al. (2016) Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2016.08.073.
dc.identifier.issn1540-7489
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.proci.2016.08.073
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622336
dc.description.abstractPulverized bituminous coal was burned in a 10. W externally heated entrained flow furnace under air-combustion and three oxy-combustion inlet oxygen conditions (28, 32, and 36%). Experiments were designed to produce flames with practically relevant stoichiometric ratios (SR. =1.2-1.4) and constant residence times (2.3. s). Size-classified fly ash samples were collected, and measurements focused on the soot, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) composition of the total and ultrafine (<0.6. μm) fly ash. Results indicate that although the total fly ash carbon, as measured by loss on ignition, was always acceptably low (<2%) with all three oxy-combustion conditions lower than air-combustion, the ultrafine fly ash for both air-fired and oxy-fired combustion conditions consists primarily of carbonaceous material (50-95%). Carbonaceous components on particles <0.6. μm measured by a thermal optical method showed that large fractions (52-93%) consisted of OC rather than EC, as expected. This observation was supported by thermogravimetric analysis indicating that for the air, 28% oxy, and 32% oxy conditions, 14-71% of this material may be OC volatilizing between 100. C and 550. C with the remaining 29-86% being EC/soot. However, for the 36% oxy condition, OC may comprise over 90% of the ultrafine carbon with a much smaller EC/soot contribution. These data were interpreted by considering the effects of oxy-combustion on flame attachment, ignition delay, and soot oxidation of a bituminous coal, and the effects of these processes on OC and EC emissions. Flame aerodynamics and inlet oxidant composition may influence emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from a bituminous coal. During oxy-coal combustion, judicious control of inlet oxygen concentration and placement may be used to minimize organic HAP and soot emissions.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectElemental carbon
dc.subjectLoss on ignition
dc.subjectOrganic carbon
dc.subjectOxy-coal combustion
dc.subjectUltrafine fly ash
dc.titleSoot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Program
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Combustion Institute
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
dc.contributor.institutionOak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA
dc.contributor.institutionNational Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
dc.contributor.institutionARCADIS U.S. Inc., Durham, NC 27713, USA
dc.contributor.institutionJacobs Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
kaust.personRoberts, William L.


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