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dc.contributor.authorPinsky, Malin L.
dc.contributor.authorSaenz-Agudelo, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorSalles, Océane C.
dc.contributor.authorAlmany, Glenn R.
dc.contributor.authorBode, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.
dc.contributor.authorAndréfouët, Serge
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Geoffrey P.
dc.contributor.authorPlanes, Serge
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T08:42:38Z
dc.date.available2017-01-02T08:42:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-15
dc.identifier.citationPinsky ML, Saenz-Agudelo P, Salles OC, Almany GR, Bode M, et al. (2016) Marine Dispersal Scales Are Congruent over Evolutionary and Ecological Time. Current Biology. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.053.
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2016.10.053
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622217
dc.description.abstractThe degree to which offspring remain near their parents or disperse widely is critical for understanding population dynamics, evolution, and biogeography, and for designing conservation actions. In the ocean, most estimates suggesting short-distance dispersal are based on direct ecological observations of dispersing individuals, while indirect evolutionary estimates often suggest substantially greater homogeneity among populations. Reconciling these two approaches and their seemingly competing perspectives on dispersal has been a major challenge. Here we show for the first time that evolutionary and ecological measures of larval dispersal can closely agree by using both to estimate the distribution of dispersal distances. In orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) populations in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, we found that evolutionary dispersal kernels were 17 km (95% confidence interval: 12–24 km) wide, while an exhaustive set of direct larval dispersal observations suggested kernel widths of 27 km (19–36 km) or 19 km (15–27 km) across two years. The similarity between these two approaches suggests that ecological and evolutionary dispersal kernels can be equivalent, and that the apparent disagreement between direct and indirect measurements can be overcome. Our results suggest that carefully applied evolutionary methods, which are often less expensive, can be broadly relevant for understanding ecological dispersal across the tree of life.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research accomplished in this project was conducted under James Cook University ethics approval number A1643 and followed all guidelines for the country in which it took place. We thank Robin Waples for advice on Ne calculations, Raphael Leblois for advice on Migraine, and the many volunteers and local assistants who helped with field collections. We also thank R. Batt, P. Flanagan, J. Hoey, B. Selden, and E. Tekwa for comments on manuscript drafts. Funding was provided by a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship, a Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, an International Society for Reef Studies Fellowship, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship BR2014-044, National Science Foundation grant OCE-1430218, and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982216312878
dc.subjectpopulation genetics
dc.subjectconnectivity
dc.subjectisolation by distance
dc.subjectmetapopulation
dc.subjectreef fish
dc.subjectlarvae
dc.subjectcoral reef
dc.subjectPapua New Guinea
dc.titleMarine Dispersal Scales Are Congruent over Evolutionary and Ecological Time
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Biology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 5090000, Chile
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire d’Excellence “CORAIL,” USR 3278 CNRS-EPHE-UPVD CRIOBE, 58 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan, France
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
dc.contributor.institutionUMR 250 ENTROPIE (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Université de la Réunion, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), BP A5, Noumea, 98848, New Caledonia
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Science and Engineering and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
kaust.personBerumen, Michael L.
dc.date.published-online2016-12-15
dc.date.published-print2017-01


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