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dc.contributor.authorNie, Anmin
dc.contributor.authorGan, Li-yong
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Yingchun
dc.contributor.authorTao, Xinyong
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Yifei
dc.contributor.authorSharifi-Asl, Soroosh
dc.contributor.authorHe, Kun
dc.contributor.authorAsayesh-Ardakani, Hasti
dc.contributor.authorVasiraju, Venkata
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorMashayek, Farzad
dc.contributor.authorKlie, Robert
dc.contributor.authorVaddiraju, Sreeram
dc.contributor.authorSchwingenschlögl, Udo
dc.contributor.authorShahbazian-Yassar, Reza
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T13:21:32Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T13:21:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-17
dc.identifier.citationNie A, Gan L, Cheng Y, Tao X, Yuan Y, et al. (2015) Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials. Advanced Functional Materials 26: 543–552. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201504461.
dc.identifier.issn1616-301X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adfm.201504461
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621637
dc.description.abstractThe progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s-1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the nanowires display about 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. In addition, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na+ diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries. Sodium ions can be stored in Zn4 Sb3 nanowires with a speed of 295.5 nm/s, which is one to three orders of magnitude higher than that of other nanowires electrochemically tested by the same method. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled dozens of times without any internal fracture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
dc.description.sponsorshipA.N. and L.-Y.G. contributed equally to this work. R. Shahbazian-Yassar acknowledges the financial support from the National Science Foundation (Award No. CMMI-1200383). The acquisition of the UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF was supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Award No. DMR-0959470). Support from the UIC Research Resources Center is also acknowledged. Theoretical simulations reported in this publication were supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adfm.201504461/full
dc.subjectAnode
dc.subjectHigh rate
dc.subjectIn situ (S)TEM
dc.subjectSodium-ion batteries
dc.subjectZinc-antimony intermetallic
dc.titleUltrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentComputational Physics and Materials Science (CPMS)
dc.contributor.departmentMaterial Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Science and Engineering (PSE) Division
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Functional Materials
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; University of Illinois at Chicago; 842 West Taylor Street Chicago IL 60607 USA
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Materials (Ministry of Education); Superconductivity and New Energy R&D Center; Southwest Jiaotong University; Chengdu Sichuan 610031 P. R. China
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Advanced Materials (IAM); Nanjing Tech University; Nanjing 211816 P. R. China
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Materials Science and Engineering; Zhejiang University of Technology; Hangzhou 310014 P. R. China
dc.contributor.institutionChemical Science and Engineering Division; Argonne National Laboratory; 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA
dc.contributor.institutionArtie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering; Texas A&M University; 3122 TAMU College Station ,TX 77843 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics; University of Illinois at Chicago; Chicago IL 60607 USA
kaust.personSchwingenschlögl, Udo
dc.date.published-online2015-12-17
dc.date.published-print2016-01


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