Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPrest, E. I.
dc.contributor.authorHammes, F.
dc.contributor.authorKotzsch, S.
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, M. C. M.
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T08:29:56Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T08:29:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-05
dc.identifier.citationPrest EI, Hammes F, Kotzsch S, van Loosdrecht MCM, Vrouwenvelder JS (2016) A systematic approach for the assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors linked to biological stability of drinking water in distribution systems. Water Science and Technology: Water Supply 16: 865–880. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/ws.2016.001.
dc.identifier.issn1606-9749
dc.identifier.issn1607-0798
dc.identifier.doi10.2166/ws.2016.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621463
dc.description.abstractA systematic approach is presented for the assessment of (i) bacterial growth-controlling factors in drinking water and (ii) the impact of distribution conditions on the extent of bacterial growth in full-scale distribution systems. The approach combines (i) quantification of changes in autochthonous bacterial cell concentrations in full-scale distribution systems with (ii) laboratoryscale batch bacterial growth potential tests of drinking water samples under defined conditions. The growth potential tests were done by direct incubation of water samples, without modification of the original bacterial flora, and with flow cytometric quantification of bacterial growth. This method was shown to be reproducible (ca. 4% relative standard deviation) and sensitive (detection of bacterial growth down to 5 μg L-1 of added assimilable organic carbon). The principle of step-wise assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors was demonstrated on bottled water, shown to be primarily carbon limited at 133 (±18) × 103 cells mL-1 and secondarily limited by inorganic nutrients at 5,500 (±1,700) × 103 cells mL-1. Analysis of the effluent of a Dutch full-scale drinking water treatment plant showed (1) bacterial growth inhibition as a result of end-point chlorination, (2) organic carbon limitation at 192 (±72) × 103 cells mL-1 and (3) inorganic nutrient limitation at 375 (±31) × 103 cells mL-1. Significantly lower net bacterial growth was measured in the corresponding full-scale distribution system (176 (±25) × 103 cells mL-1) than in the laboratory-scale growth potential test of the same water (294 (±35) × 103 cells mL-1), highlighting the influence of distribution on bacterial growth. The systematic approach described herein provides quantitative information on the effect of drinking water properties and distribution system conditions on biological stability, which can assist water utilities in decision-making on treatment or distribution system improvements to better control bacterial growth during water distribution. © 2016 IWA Publishing.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication is based upon work supported by Evides Waterbedrijf and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) under Award No. URF/1/1728-01-01.
dc.publisherIWA Publishing
dc.subjectBacterial growth limitations
dc.subjectBiological stability
dc.subjectDistribution networks
dc.subjectDrinking water
dc.subjectFlow cytometry
dc.subjectGrowth potential
dc.titleA systematic approach for the assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors linked to biological stability of drinking water in distribution systems
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
dc.identifier.journalWater Science and Technology: Water Supply
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, Delft, Netherlands
dc.contributor.institutionEAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 133, Dübendorf, Switzerland
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus, European Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Oostergoweg 9, Leeuwarden, Netherlands
kaust.personVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.
kaust.grant.numberURF/1/1728-01-01
kaust.acknowledged.supportUnitOffice of Sponsored Research
dc.date.published-online2016-01-05
dc.date.published-print2016-08-01


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record