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dc.contributor.authorSalles, Océane C.
dc.contributor.authorSaenz-Agudelo, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorAlmany, Glenn R.
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.
dc.contributor.authorJones, Geoffrey P.
dc.contributor.authorPlanes, Serge
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T08:29:41Z
dc.date.available2016-11-03T08:29:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-26
dc.identifier.citationSalles OC, Saenz-Agudelo P, Almany GR, Berumen ML, Thorrold SR, et al. (2016) Genetic tools link long-term demographic and life-history traits of anemonefish to their anemone hosts. Coral Reefs. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00338-016-1485-1.
dc.identifier.issn0722-4028
dc.identifier.issn1432-0975
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-016-1485-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621453
dc.description.abstractThe life-history traits and population dynamics of species are increasingly being attributed to the characteristics of their preferred habitats. While coral reef fish are often strongly associated with particular habitats, long-term studies establishing the demographic and life-history consequences of occupying different reef substrata are rare and no studies have monitored individuals in situ over their lifetime and determined the fate of their offspring. Here, we documented a quasi-turnover and local reproductive success for an entire population of orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, by taking bi-annual samples of DNA over a 10-yr period (2003–2013). We compared demographic and life-history traits of individuals living on two host anemone species, Heteractis magnifica and Stichodactyla gigantea, including female size, adult continued presence (a proxy for relative longevity range), early post-settlement growth, the number of eggs per clutch and ‘local’ reproductive success (defined for each adult as the number of offspring returning to the natal population). Our results indicate that while the relative longevity of adults was similar on both host anemone species, females living in H. magnifica were larger than females in S. gigantea. However, despite females growing larger and producing more eggs on H. magnifica, we found that local reproductive success was significantly higher for clownfish living in S. gigantea. Life-history traits also exhibited local spatial variation, with higher local reproductive success recorded for adults living on S. gigantea on the eastern side of the island. Our findings support a ‘silver-spoon’ hypothesis that predicts individuals that are fortunate enough to recruit into good habitat and location will be rewarded with higher long-term reproductive success and will make a disproportionate contribution to population renewal. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
dc.description.sponsorshipWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Research Council
dc.description.sponsorshipLabex Corail
dc.description.sponsorshipGEF CRTR Connectivity Working Group
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF
dc.description.sponsorshipARC CoE Coral Reef Studies
dc.description.sponsorshipTNC
dc.description.sponsorshipTotal Fundation
dc.description.sponsorshipJCU
dc.description.sponsorshipKAUST
dc.description.sponsorshipCRISP
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.subjectAmphiprion percula
dc.titleGenetic tools link long-term demographic and life-history traits of anemonefish to their anemone hosts
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Program
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Science Program
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)
dc.identifier.journalCoral Reefs
dc.contributor.institutionEPHE, PSL Research University, UPVD-CNRS, USR3278 CRIOBE, Perpignan, France
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire d’Excellence ‘CORAIL’, Perpignan, France
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia
kaust.personBerumen, Michael L.
dc.date.published-online2016-07-26
dc.date.published-print2016-12


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